K-19: The Widowmaker (2002) Script

DEMICHEV: All compartments report readiness.

OFFICER: Move, up, up.

Compartment one, manned and ready.

CREWMAN 1: Compartment two, manned and ready.

Compartment four, manned and ready.

CREWMAN 2: Compartment five, manned and ready.

Compartment six, manned and ready.

ANATOLY: Compartment seven, manned and ready.

Compartment eight, manned and ready.

VANYA: Compartment nine, manned and ready.

(MAN SHOUTING)

Compartment 10, manned and ready.

Comrade Captain, the boat is manned and ready for live firing of the main missile batteries.

Activate emergency action procedure for nuclear weapon release.

Comrade Captain, the Political Department stands ready to do its duty. Excuse me.

Hydraulics to number one missile tube open.

(BEEPS)

Comrade Captain, Moscow has confirmed nuclear weapons release authority.

Number one hatch open. Silo free of water.

Powering up consoles for missile launch.

Powering number one missile console.

Poliansky, maintain current course and speed.

POLIANSKY: Course steady 2-9-0. Maintaining speed, six knots.

MAXIM: Hatch number one open. Silo free of water.

MALAHOV: Fueling in progress.

Proceed with activation of the warhead on number one missile.

Up scope. VOSLENSKY: Periscope going up.

Demichev, back to the conn.

POLIANSKY: Prepare number three tube to the active state.

CREWMAN 3: Switch fire control console to primary.

CREWMAN 4: Bypass valve shut.

CREWMAN 5: Console to position one primary.

POLIANSKY: Sixty seconds within range, Comrade Captain.

Prepare for emergency dive after launch.

CREWMAN 4: Arming number one missile. Armed to go.

Number one missile fueled. The table elevated.

Table elevated.

Down scope. Ready for firing sequence.

Launch number one missile.

Time to launch, 15 seconds.

14, 13, 12, 11, 10...

Captain, we've been fired on. Enemy torpedo at bearing 1 -9-0.

Seven... Dive the submarine.

Keep 50 meters. Keep 50 meters.

Both turbines full ahead together. Full ahead together.

Three, two, one... Captain!

(GRUNTS IN FRUSTRATION)

POLENIN: Force manual override!

Missile launching sequencer not responding.

Estimate torpedo at 6,000 meters.

The drill is over!

Well, Comrade Polenin.

Do you have an explanation for this disappointment?

Comrade Admiral, we all know it's just another burnout in the ignition sequence.

Comrade Captain, I will require the names of those responsible.

I don't know their names.

How the hell would I know the name of the jackass that supplied a 30-kopeck insulator to do a 50-kopeck job?

That's what I have to fight before I can fight a war!

Comrade Admiral, the boat will be at sea.

On schedule, before the month is out.

I'll give you a name. My name. Polenin, Mikhail. Captain, K-19!

Suslov, write it down.


(MEN CHATTERING)


BRATYEEV: After you've successfully completed trials on the mechanical, propulsion, and navigation systems in the Barents Sea, you'll proceed beneath the ice to the launch area here and test-fire the missile.

My orders were to prepare K-19 for sea trials, and they'll begin on schedule.

But until the trials are complete, to undertake an exercise of this scope may be, with respect, premature.

There is no doubt in my mind that K-19 is ready to fulfill her mission.

Operation Arctic Circle is no mere exercise.

What is to stop the Americans from destroying Moscow and Leningrad? Only one thing.

A certain knowledge of destruction in return.

K-19 is that knowledge.

But not until Kennedy has been told by his own spy planes that we have it.

And it works. I've promised Comrade Khrushchev that the American president will receive his message before the end of the month.

Comrade Marshal, perhaps Captain Polenin might...

ZELENTSTOV: Captain Polenin put his boat and his men before the Party.

He will be under your command.

That's all there is to it.


Check the power supply is isolated. OFFICER: Right.

Captain on the CCP.

Please. Captain.

What's your name, please? Demichev.

Torpedo officer, Comrade Captain.

And may I ask the Captain's name and his purpose aboard our boat?

My name is Vostrikov. Where's Captain Polenin?

Come in.

Yes?

Good morning, Captain.

Comrade Captain Vostrikov. That'll be all, Yuri.

Come in, please.

Captain.

With the short lead-in time to sea trials, headquarters wanted your expertise on board, and I am pleased to have it. I know this could be difficult for you.

It's never difficult to do one's duty, Captain.

I was preparing my briefing on the crew and on the boat.

I see. The problem's filling her out.

But my orders said you would not be arriving until tomorrow.

Well, the briefing can wait. Please, show me the boat.

Yes, of course.

We're finally getting the turbines up to speed.

With luck, I'd say, in another week we might be able to run a test.

POLIANSKY: The equipment has not yet arrived, Comrade Captain.

(WATER DRIPPING)

Noted, Comrade Captain.

POLENIN: The reactor compartment.

How hot are you running it?

We're at 50% for the turbine test, Captain.

And what is the absorption rate of the rods?

3% above normal.

Where is the reactor officer?

Lieutenant Yashin?

Um...

(SNORING)

(THUD)

This man is drunk. Do you tolerate this?

Of course not.

Prepare charges against this man.

Inform Command we need an immediate replacement.

Yes, Captain.

POLENIN: Lieutenant Yashin is the best reactor officer in the Navy.

He's never been drunk on duty before.

We need him, Captain. I urge you to reconsider.

I want this boat out of dry dock. Sea trials begin in two weeks.

The boat isn't ready, Captain. The problem is Moscow.

They organized Party VIP tours while we're stuck with incompetent yard crews and defective parts.

Sea trials will begin as scheduled. We deliver or we drown.

(BAND PLAYING CEREMONIAL MUSIC)

In the history of the Soviet Navy, no sailors

have been given such a boat as K-19.

It is the finest submarine in the world.

You have been given the honor to be her crew.

I have been given the honor to be your captain.

Without me, you are nothing.

Without you, I am nothing.

Much is expected of us.

We will not fail.

(BAND PLAYING CEREMONIAL MUSIC)


We're cursed.

DOCK CREWMAN 1: Easy, easy.

DOCK CREWMAN 2: Keep it forward. DOCK CREWMAN 3: Keep it level.

Now down, down.

Coming through.

Permission to pass? What do you have there?

A new scope for the sonar station, Captain.

Carry on. Install it.

I work on the reactor, Comrade Captain.

Where is the sonar officer? He's on a 24-hour pass, Captain.

I initiated the relief rotation. I think it's good for efficiency.

No more passes. All leaves are canceled.

We need everyone here to do their jobs.

POLENIN: Yes, Captain.

Comrade Captain.

Lieutenant Vadim Radtchenko reporting for duty.

I'm your new reactor officer.

What was your last posting? Nuclear training academy.

He's never operated a reactor at sea.

I was first in my class.

Report to the reactor control room. Yes, sir.

That way. Thank you.

Captain...

He's qualified, or Command wouldn't have sent him to us.

Officer on deck.

Pavel Loktev, senior technician.

Stepan Komarov, Anatoly Subachev, Grigori Dyomin, Oleg Argunov.

Show me to the control room.

Anatoly.


CREWMAN 1: Take it! CREWMAN 2: Hurry up, boy!

(MEN SHOUTING)

CREWMAN 3: What's all this there? CREWMAN 4: Coming through.

Watch out! I have to stop the truck!

They gave me the wrong drugs!

Stop the truck!

Hey! Hey! Stop! Stop! Wrong drugs!

You gave me the wrong drugs!

You idiot! Stop!

(HORN HONKING)

OFFICER: Help him! Help him! Go.

VASILY: Doctor! CREWMAN 5: It's the doctor!

(ALL MURMURING)

He's dead.

Stay with the body till the ambulance comes.

The rest of you, back to work.

Back to work!

Gavril.

Captain.

Ever since the solid ballast was loaded, we've had a half-degree list to port.

I've tried everything, but she won't even up.

Half-degree we can handle.

We'll compensate with sea water ballast till we get back to port.

If we get back to port.

You know what the men are calling this boat?

The Widowmaker.

Five died from fumes sealing the tanks. Another four in construction.

And now the doctor. The champagne bottle.

Ten dead, and we haven't left dock.

VOSTRIKOV: I'm surprised they confide their fears to their commanding officer.

A crew is a family. The captain is the father.

My own father inspired more fear than he indulged.

I was told there are two versions about your father.

One, he was a hero of the Revolution. Two, he died in the Gulag.

Both are true.

How are those safety checks going on down below, Captain?

Proceeding.

YEVGENY: Misha, Misha.

There you go.

(RAT SQUEAKING)

Forty centimeters of headroom, and he gives half to a rodent.

(CREWMAN LAUGHS)

Yevgeny, wrap this around your private parts.

The gamma rays can...

(CHUCKLES)

You should also take your dosimeter once a day to the doctor.

Why? He reads it and tells you how long you have before your torpedo falls off.

(ALL LAUGH)

SAVRAN: Captain?

I'm Gennadi Savran, your new medical officer.

What was your last posting?

No, no, no. I am the base physician here.

They said there was an emergency. So here I am.

Welcome to K-19, Doctor.

Captain, we will be back soon, won't we?

I get... What?

Seasick.

(GLASS TINKLING)

Gentlemen. Gentlemen. Misha, please.

Vostrikov marries a girl...

POLENIN: Yuri, Yuri, you promised, you promised.

Vostrikov marries a girl with top Party connections.

He knows which fork they use for salad, so they make him a captain.

(ALL LAUGHING)

Yuri, that's why you've never been promoted.

Be quiet. We are all good communists here.

To good communists! ALL: To good communists!

You're drunk. Sit down. Sit down.

Gentlemen, gentlemen, a little bit of respect.

Captain Vostrikov does not know you the way I do.

You're still the captain, as far as we're concerned.

Listen, he's the captain. I'm executive officer.

I'm pleased. I'm going to be with my boys. My turn.

They say there was a cosmonaut who orbited Earth before Yuri Gagarin.

But he was not loyal enough to hold his breath when his life support system gave out.

So now, he never existed.

Gagarin was lucky.

Let's hope we are, too. To luck!

ALL: To luck! To luck!

To luck! To luck!

Vadim!

Vadim! Katya!

Katya! Vadim!

Vadim!

(SPEAKING RUSSIAN)

Don't worry. Don't worry. Don't go.

(HORN HONKING)

VOSTRIKOV: Defense Minister Zelentsov, Admiral Bratyeev, request permission to carry out orders in defense of the motherland.

Carry out your patriotic duty.

All hands down. All hands down.

Single up all lines. Single up all lines.

Single up lines!

VOSTRIKOV: Land the gangway!

POLENIN: Land the gangway!

CREWMAN: Gangway landed!

Gangway landed!

- K-19 ready for sea, Captain. Port turbine, slow ahead.

POLENIN: Port turbine, slow ahead.

I just hope you picked the right man.


All compartments, prepare to dive.

VOSTRIKOV: Top hatches closed and latched!

GORELOV: Open the mid-ship vent.

VOSLENSKY: Mid-ship vent open. Ready to dive, Captain.

Dive the boat. Speed, six knots. Make your depth 50 meters.

Speed, six knots. Planesman, make your depth 50 meters.

Making depth 50 meters. GORELOV: Slow ahead together.

PLANESMAN: Slow ahead together.

VOSTRIKOV: Course? Course is steady 3-2-3, Captain.

Depth under the keel. Echo sound reads 350 meters, Captain.

Twenty meters.

Thirty meters.

(WATER DRIPPING)

Don't worry. It'll stop once the pressure increases.

(LAUGHING)

Simulate an electrical fire in the galley, please.

Fire in switchbox number 65. This is a drill.

Repeat. This is a drill.

(ALL SHOUTING)

(ALARM SOUNDING)

CREWMAN 1: We're stuck.

PLANESMAN: Fifty meters.

Fire has spread to the next compartment.

Simulate electrical failure, compartment four.

Electrical failure, compartment four. This is a drill.

Compartment four, loss of electrical power. This is a drill!

CREWMAN 2: Emergency lights. Prepare the cable. Let's go.

Fire's out in the galley, Captain.

Too much damage. Too many casualties.

Simulate flooding, compartment four.

Make them work in the dark.

(ALARM CONTINUES SOUNDING)

(MEN SHOUTING)

If this were not a drill, the boat would be crippled and half the crew would be dead.

Let me speak to the officer in charge.

Try it again tomorrow.


I only wanted to say how sympathetic I am about the change in command.

These decisions are not always for us to understand.

Thank you, Comrade Suslov.

Still, you must feel it's an honor to serve on this boat in any capacity.

Indeed.

It's historic.

If you'll excuse me.

Checking the aft pressurizer?

Yes, Lieutenant.

You know, religious icons are forbidden.

Yeah?

Hmm.

This is the future, Pavel.

Cars that never need refueling. Free power for every family.

Maybe even travel to the planets.

It's a privilege to be a part of this future.

Yes, Lieutenant.

Okay.

(DOOR CLOSING)


Good morning, gentlemen.

(ALL GROANING)

What's this?

At sea, we only shower on Saturdays.

Action stations. Chemical fire in motor control compartment.

This is a drill.

Watch out!

(ALARM SOUNDING)

Fire in the main switchboards. C2L.

Valve rupture in compartment eight.

Torpedo fuel-spill in aft torpedo room.

Start the drill again.

(UPBEAT MUSIC PLAYING)

(OMINOUS MUSIC PLAYING)

Comrades, officers and sailors, remember, the American propaganda will always try to play on your baser primitive instincts.

Greed, lust, individualism.

In American propaganda, you will see how everybody has a car, nice clothes, a nice apartment, but you will never see the truth behind this lie.

You will not see police dogs attacking strikers and demonstrators for civil rights.

You will not see the beggars in the streets. The homeless.

The negro shantytowns of the South. You will not see the warmongers who threaten the world with nuclear holocaust.

Stand by to simulate firing torpedo number eight.

Number eight isn't loaded, Captain. I know that.

I want you to unload seven and load eight.

Now, please. POLENIN: Captain?

Ice formations near our depth.

I suggest we go deeper and run the drill later.

Negative. Ice formations will not be suspended in the event of war.

Unload seven torpedo. Load eight torpedo.

Unload seven torpedo. Load eight torpedo. This is a drill.

DMITRI: Do we ever stop? We need the rest.

Yevsky, quiet! Proceed to your action stations immediately.

Come on!

Engage running gear.

Torpedo withdrawal.

Open breach door number eight.

Traverse torpedo!

Traversing torpedo!

(CREWMAN SCREAMING)

VASILY: Come on, help me!

Reverse the chain!

Come on, don't stop!

Vasily? Vasily?

Two men are injured.

Have them seen by the doctor, and start the drill again.

Two men short, Captain.

Have them put the torpedo back in tube seven and start the drill again.

CREWMAN 1: Traverse torpedo! CREWMAN 2: Traversing torpedo!

POLENIN: Going under. Clear.

Attention!

At ease.

I was told there was some complaining.

But I said, "Not my men."

They're the best crew in the fleet. They will pull till the last.

So, any complaints?

There's no complaints here, Captain.

Good.

(SHUSHING)

It's not the men's fault.

It's your fault. The officers.

You have failed to set high standards. To correct their deficiencies.

If you do your job, the men will do theirs.

That is all.

(CLEARS THROAT)

POLIANSKY: What's her name?

Katya.

She's pretty.

Hey.

She's pretty. Hey.

Sorry.

Yeah, I am writing to her. Where are you going to mail it?

It's in case I die.

In case you die?

In case I die.


Report to Captain.

Five miles from missile launch area. We are ahead of schedule.

Good morning, gentlemen.

Course to steer 1 -8-5.

1 -8-5.

Captain.

Captain.

Conduct emergency dive drill.

Bow planes are jammed 20 degrees down.

Bow planes are jammed 20 degrees down.

CREWMAN 1: Set. Twenty degrees down on the bow plane.

(ALARM SOUNDING)

Bow planes are jammed. Twenty degrees down.

I have the conn.

(GROANS)

CREWMAN 2: Move!

(GRUNTS)

(SIGHS)

120 meters.

130 meters.

140 meters.

150 meters.

Take the boat down to maximum operational depth.

Make your depth 250 meters. Turbines slow ahead together.

(RINGING)


Thank you.

POLIANSKY: 240 meters.

250 meters.

Captain, I respectfully suggest going below 250 meters is an unnecessary risk.

Continue the dive to 300 meters.

Three hundred meters is close to crush depth.

I know.

260 meters.

Make your depth 300 meters.

(LOUD THUDDING)

POLIANSKY: 280 meters.

290 meters.

Three hundred meters, Captain.

Level the planes. Level the bow planes.

(THUDDING)

Simulate flooding in the aft torpedo room.

And emergency surface.

A rapid ascent beneath the ice cap is not advisable, Captain.

I did not ask for your advice.

(LOUD CREAKING)

Flooding in compartment 10. Emergency surface.

Go, go, go, go, go!

Main stations, valve five!

CREWMAN: Secure the base.

Poliansky. Captain?

Bring the planes to full rise. Keep them up.

Make turns for 20 knots. Full ahead together.

Planes to full rise. Full ahead together. Keep 10 up. Speed, 20 knots.

(GROANS)

Pavel, wedge!

Hold it steady! Go!

Need another wedge.

Go! Go! Go!

(ALL SHOUTING)

The rupture is sealed, Captain. Excellent.

Recommend we stay at safe depth, Captain.

How thick is the ice here? Kornilov? Ice recon?

Come on, come on.

Less than one meter in this area, Captain.

POLENIN: These reports are almost a week old.

This time of year, the ice is only getting thinner.

Continue surfacing.

I'm not sure if we can control an ascent this fast, Captain.

Neither am I. POLIANSKY: 130 meters.

120 meters.

110 meters. Blow main ballast!

She's starting to roll!

Request permission to hold at safe depth.

Denied. Ninety meters!

VOSLENSKY: Pump room! Are we pumping the trim tanks?

She's rolling to port.

Blow port. Shut starboard.

CREWMAN: Changing over to alternate air supply.

Sixty meters!

Stop turbines. Stop both turbines.

(RINGING)

Level off, damn it! Forty meters!

Brace for impact!

Brace for impact! Brace for impact.


(PANTING)

(WHISTLES)

Demichev.

(DOOR SLAMS)

Demichev, take the conn.

Raise the radio and radar masts.

Give me three sweeps. Medium range.


Prepare to fire the test missile.

(DOOR CLOSES)

Prepare to launch test missile.

This is not a drill.

Central command, missile control manned and ready.

Preparing silo three for firing test missile.

Power up console for missile launch.

Number three launch door opening.


(BEEPS)

Comrade Captain, Moscow confirms test missile launch authority.

Attention! Initiating power-up procedure, Captain.

Very well.

MALAHOV: Fueling in progress.

Simulate activation of the warhead, number three missile.

Let's go. Come on.

Contact? No contacts.

Radar, sonar, contact?

RADAR OPERATOR: No contact. SERGEI: No contact.

Fueling complete. Table elevated. Ready for firing sequence.

Fire missile three.

PASHINSKI: Time to launch, 15 seconds, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.


Confirm missile away, Captain.

Congratulations, Comrade Captain.

We just wrote our names into the history books.

VOSTRIKOV: Kornilov. Captain?

Confirm successful missile launch to Fleet Command.

Yes, Captain.

This is the captain.

We have successfully launched our test missile.

All hands stand down from combat stations.

Yes!

(ALL CHEERING)

You will be in my report for leaving your post.

And you will be in mine!

You needlessly endangered this boat and its crew.

Two hundred million Soviet citizens are depending on us.

On us, Captain Vostrikov, to save them from nuclear attack.

You risked them as well!

I took this boat and these men to the edge because we need to know where it is.

These 120 men are a crew now because they achieved something together that they did not think they could do.

Next time, when it is not a drill, they will go to the edge and past it and die, if necessary, because that is what their duty demands of them.

You were lucky, Captain. This time.

I hope I'm on another boat when your luck runs out.

(SHOUTING)

(ALL CHEERING)

(LAUGHING)

(KNOCK ON DOOR)

Misha, Yelstin, come on, quick. Everybody!

Get that laundry out of there. I want my crewmen around the flag.

Get that laundry out of there!

Branan, you're asleep. On the double. Get closer.

CREWMAN: Over here.

SUSLOV: Everybody move, yes.

Closer. Closer!

Move closer.

Uh-huh, uh-huh.

Winning team closer.

Dmitri, smile.

Good.


Everything all right? Problems?

No.

No. Yes.

There was some residual condensation in the reactor compartment, but I shut down the number three generator, and that should reduce the condensation.

I'm counting on you, you know?

Yes, Comrade Captain.

Comrade Captain?

Message from Command.

POLIANSKY: Comrade Commander, the crew is lined up to your order.

We have received a message from Moscow.

They congratulate us on the successful launch of our test missile.

We have proved our readiness.

Serving the Soviet Union! Serving the Soviet Union!

And now they honor us with a new assignment.

K-19 is to assume missile patrol along the Eastern Seaboard of the United States.

(SIGHS)

This is a mission of critical strategic importance.

The boat will come to full operational status.

Do your best. I expect nothing less.

(ALL SHOUTING)

POLIANSKY: Crew dismissed!

He nearly got us killed today.

And for what?

To show the men he didn't win his bars by marrying a Politburo member's niece?

You are still our captain, Misha.

And the only one we trust.

(KNOCK AT DOOR)

Captain Polenin? Yes?

Captain Vostrikov wants to see you in the chart room.

Yes.

Misha.

(DOOR CLOSES)

Command wants us on station as quickly as possible.

Our course will take us past the NATO base at Jan Mayen, and from there to our patrol zone 400 kilometers off the coastline.

Between Washington

and New York.

Make turns for 15 knots.

Speed 15 knots. Speed 15 knots.

No contacts, down scope. CREWMAN: Periscope going down.

Dive the boat.

(ALL CHATTERING)

Andrei, more wine. You only get one glass.

But because we are the crème de la crème, a glass of red wine with dinner is the headquarters' way of telling us that the crew of the K-19 has no equal.

No, it's because we're sitting on a pile of uranium.

Red wine gives you strontium. Or takes it away.

Or something. Something good.

(ALL LAUGHING)

(FAST-PACED FOLK MUSIC PLAYING)

(ALL CHEERING)

So we should be 70 miles from Jan Mayen NATO base.

One mountain. No trees. Fifteen men. One radio station.

I've seen that island so many times from the periscope.

(CLASSICAL MUSIC PLAYING)


Misha. VASILY: Yevgeny.

What's the matter?

I miss seeing the trees. Seeing the sun, the stars.

You get used to being underwater.

When I muster out, I'll just go work in the coal mines with my brothers.

(SIGHS)

So it's all the same to me.


(WHIRRING)

(WATER BUBBLING)

(ALARM BLARING)

A loss of pressure in the primary circuit on the aft reactor.

Check the other sensors.

Confirm loss of pressure, Lieutenant.

Let me through, watch out! We've got a leak!

Give me the emergency manual.

Come on!

Lieutenant, I noticed the pumps were drawing too much power during the turbine tests, but I didn't think it was serious.

VADIM: Out of my way!

Move! CREWMAN 1: Careful!

CREWMAN 2: The control rods are dropping, Lieutenant.

Auxiliary pumps.

Pavel, auxiliary pumps.

The auxiliary pumps aren't working either.

Recycle them!

I have, but the pressure keeps dropping.

Confirm.

But the rods will cool it, right? No!

They can't control the reaction by themselves. They need coolant.

Lieutenant, the core temperature is at 400 degrees and rising!

Cut equalization!

(PANTING)

What's the problem?

The primary coolant loop on the aft reactor's ruptured.

What?

How did this happen? What difference does it make?

Answer my question. How did this happen?

I don't know, Captain.

The core is heating up. The mission's over!

I'll tell you when the mission is over.

Who's responsible for this? I want a name.

You want a name? I'll give you a name. Vostrikov, Alexei.

Watch yourself, Comrade.

And here's another name. Radtchenko, Vadim.

The untested reactor officer you put on this boat.

We will fix this problem. We will continue the mission.

Surface. Surface the boat! Surface the boat!

How bad is it? The leak is in the sealed area.

There's no way to get to it.

The temperature will keep rising until it reaches 1,000 degrees, and...

And?

And what?

No one knows.

It could start a chain reaction. There would be radiation leakage.

The core would melt through the reactor and start a thermonuclear explosion.

How long do we have?

Three or four hours.

It could be less.

Get whoever you need, regardless of rank, and solve this. Yes, Comrade Captain.

Solve this. That's why you're here. You understand?

Get up!

Get up!

Get up! CREWMAN: Another drill?

Doesn't he ever get tired of drills?

MAXIM: Let's go. Let's go!

This is the captain.

We've had a malfunction in the aft reactor.

Measures are being taken to correct the situation.

Remain at your stations.

POLENIN: Read it again.

VADIM: (READING) "In case of sudden drop

"in the pressure of the primary circuit, "measures must be taken to reduce precipitation heat release."

But this doesn't work. Reflux valve isn't here.

What measures? There are no measures. It's useless.

The rest is about the backup system, which was never installed.

As soon as we reach periscope depth, I need to speak to Fleet Command.

Yes, Comrade Captain.

Why can't we just shut the reactor down?

We have shut it down, but we can't control the reaction anymore.

Suppose we use the forward reactor. Cross-connect its pumps.

Use them to cool both.

The rupture in the reactor is not accessible.

Therefore we can't seal the leak, and we'd have two reactors out of control.

POLIANSKY: So, we still have to cool down the reactor.

Permission to speak, Lieutenant? Of course.

The coolant is just distilled water.

We have 30 tons of fresh water on board.

Yes.

But how do we get it to the core? Pass the schematic.


Kornilov, I need contact with Fleet Command. Now.

Still trying, Captain.

POLENIN: The air release pipe can deliver coolant deep enough to the core.

We can hack off the valve and pump in the fresh water supply.

We've got 30 tons, Captain.

There are some high-grade pipes in the torpedoes.

It's not much to weld. Thirty minutes at the most.

And if we can't fix it?

Hiroshima.

One point four megatons, if you factor in the two reactors and the warheads.

Only Hiroshima was less. It was a lot less.

Scuttle the boat. Get the men off in rafts.

We will not abandon this boat. Scavenge the pipes.

We'll be ready to go when command authorization comes through. Let's go.


(GRUNTS)

Have you reached Fleet Command yet? No, Comrade Captain.

Captain, the long-range antenna feeder has shorted out.

The seal must have ruptured when we submerged.

What's the range for the emergency transmitter, it's 90 kilometers?

Up to 100 kilometers, Captain. Core temperature at 490 degrees.

POLENIN: That's it. Take it, Dmitri.

ANATOLY: I'll take it, Captain. Take it.

POLENIN: Make sure no debris gets into the pipes.

GORELOV: Lay out the piping straighter.

YEVGENY: Where's the hacksaw? May I have your attention?

Men, listen.

I have decided that the reactor unit will affect the repairs.

You will go in teams of two. Ten minutes inside, maximum.

I will go in the first team.

No. I need my executive officer to command.

Yes, but under the circumstances...

I am aware of the circumstances. It's out of the question.

I'll go in the first team.

It's my duty. I am ready to serve, Comrade Captain.

Vadim? Vadim!

You will go in with the third team to inspect the repair.

Yes, Comrade Captain.

That is all. Carry on.


Quick. Get something! Quick!

VASILY: Fuel spill! ANATOLY: Fuel spill in aft torpedo.

CREWMAN: Chief?

GORELOV: Toolbox.

Feed water system isolated!

Vent off the feed water tank.

DEMICHEV: I've got three more liters here.

Meat. Just meat falling off the bone.

Nice and tender. Melts in your mouth.

Dumplings. Dumplings? Dmitri likes...

Hey, Dmitri likes dumplings.

Reactor temperature?

530 degrees.

Vasily! How long? I'd say about 15 minutes, Captain.

Good work.

Comrade Captain? Yes?

Our equipment is prepared and we're standing by to enter.

They have a few minutes. Take the men up top. Get some air.

Thank you. You heard him. Get some air.

Lieutenant, go on.

I was getting married.

You will.

You will.

Your hair falls out, or something like that.

It won't be that bad. Ten minutes is nothing.

An hour later and our watch would have been over.

It's fate.

We don't have radiation suits.

The warehouse was out. They sent us chemical suits instead.

They might as well wear raincoats. Misha, I know.

Tell the men these will help.

What else can we do? Yeah.

It's only 10 minutes. Ten minutes. Do what you can and get out.

All right, Anatoly? Yeah.

You okay? No.

It'll be fine. CREWMAN: Captain?

Men,

this difficult task has fallen to you.

Our fate is in your hands.

Request permission to carry out reactor repair, Comrade Captain.

Permission granted.

May God be with you.


(BREATHING HEAVILY)

What's the core temperature?

725 degrees.

GRIGORI: Entering airlock.

(WATER RUNNING)

(ANATOLY COUGHING)


Come on, Anatoly. Come on, easy.

How is it in there?

Doctor, Doctor. Take them to bow torpedo.

Keep them as far away from the radiation as possible.

(COUGHING)

(GASPING)

OLEG: How do you feel? SAVRAN: It's all right.


Good, good. Give me his dosimeter.

(SHUDDERING)

His radiation level is low, Doctor, yes?

Yes, of course.

Report to me on their condition. In an hour.

Good news, Anatoly. You got a mild dose.

It's all right.

Gently.

It's time. Comrades, it's time.

(GASPING)

Put your mask on. Hey, hey, hey, hey! Come on, let's go.

(GROANING)

Ten minutes. Look at me.

Come on, wake up!

Vadim! Time to go.

Go, go.

It's all right.

(CRYING)

Chief.

(KNOCKING ON DOOR)

Medic.

Come on, come on.

(COUGHING)

(RETCHING)

Chief Gorelov's gone in his place.

POLENIN: Good boy.


Captain. You... You sent for me?

Yes.

We won't be firing any missiles, so you know how to take radiation readings?

Yes, Comrade Captain. I want readings from all compartments.

Yes, Captain.

(GRUNTS)

(GROANING)

VOSTRIKOV: Temperature? 925 degrees.


How long?

Seven minutes, 40 seconds.

(COUGHING)

(BANGING ON DOOR)

(RETCHING)

POLENIN: Set him down.

Chief!

Gorelov.

Yes. Constantin's getting him.

He's getting him. You did good. You did good.

He's getting him.

Yes, yes. Yes.

(AIR HISSING)

(COUGHING)

It's flowing. It's flowing.

The coolant is flowing.

Tell the captain the coolant is flowing!

You did it. Oleg. You did it.

Chief!

You did it, my boy. You did it, my boy.

You did it. Yeah, you showed them. You showed them.

Good job. Easy, easy.

Kornilov. Give him a hand here. KORNILOV: Gently. Gently.

Okay.

Hey, come on.

I'll help you make it. Don't worry.

(SIGHS)

Captain! 950!

930! It's dropping. 920!

910.

900.

(DOOR OPENS)

Captain. Chief.


850.

830.

800.

This is the captain. The reactor appears to be under control.

Our thanks to Chief Engineer Gorelov and the third watch reactor unit for a job well done.

(GRUNTS)

Rest, boy.

Ship's head? 2-2-0, Captain.

Turn the boat around. Come to a heading of 0-4-0.

Forward motor slow ahead.

Starboard 30. Course 0-4-0.

Forward motor. Slow ahead. Starboard 30. Steering to course 0-4-0.

Back to base?

With a speed of five knots, it'll take days.

We shall be a ghost ship.


(SCANNER BUZZING)

Captain. The men are hungry.

Our food is contaminated.

Give them whatever you have in tins or in foil.

And give them red wine to slow the rate of radiation absorption.

Very well, Captain.

Captain, in here, it's only five units.

But in the reactor room, it's 10 times that.

Turn off the ventilation system.

All compartments, shut down main ventilation.

Captain, if we...

We will run the boat with skeleton crews.

Put most of the men on top.

As far away from the radiation as possible.

We're 160 kilometers from the NATO base in Jan Mayen.

We could go there. Get help from the Americans.

Under no circumstances will I abandon my boat or my crew to the enemy.

May I ask, then, what is your plan?

We're out of radio contact. If we stay on our course, Fleet Command will send the diesels to find us.

Radiation levels are rising too fast.

We're just running on electric motors. There's no time for that.

They will find us.

As usual, the captain leaves no room for doubt.

(MEN COUGHING)

Good.

Dmitri.

You're fine.

Good, you're fine, Yevgeny.

Next.

Good, yes.


Icons

are forbidden.

(COUGHING)

KORNILOV: Contact, bearing 0-1 -5. Range, 2,000 meters, Captain.

(ALL CHEERING)

Wait. Wait! Wait. Wait! Wait. Wait!

They're Americans.

Captain?

The jackals have found us. It's an American destroyer.

KORNILOV: Captain.

The Americans are contacting us on the emergency band.

Their helicopters reported our men on deck.

The captain is offering assistance.

Tell them we don't require assistance. We're just getting some air.

What are they doing? Taking pictures of us.

Hey! Hey, spies! Take a look at this!

(ALL LAUGHING)

You take a look at this! Everybody!

Look at this lovely, lovely boat!

Hey! Where are you going? Hey!

VOSTRIKOV: "Offering assistance."

They want this boat. What a victory that would be.

The waters here are over a mile deep.

We could get the men off. Scuttle the boat. They'd have to take us.

SUSLOV: Captain Polenin is right.

We have the life rafts. We can save everyone.

Scuttle the flagship of the fleet?

Present my crew to the Americans for interrogation?

Your duty now is clear, Captain. You must save their lives.

My duty is to defend the state, and I will do that to my last dying breath.

You're defending nothing but your own ambition.

Tell that to the men who are dying down there. Go on. Tell them.

There will be no more talk of surrendering to the Americans.

It is treason. You mention it one more time, I will have you confined to your quarters. And you, you are the commissar.

Representative of the Party. Responsible for crew morale.

Yes, Captain. Then act like it.

The crew need you to show courage, not fear. Fear is contagious.

Yes, Captain.

Kornilov. - Yes, Captain.

Stop monitoring the Americans. They are the enemy.

Yes, Captain.

(SCANNER BUZZING)


Help me!

Please.

How are the men?

How would I know?

I don't know the first thing about radiation sickness.

Please.

I'm giving them aspirin!

And I'm trying to prevent those that are dying from irradiating those of us that still have some hope.

Pull yourself together. You are an officer in the Soviet Navy.

Go back and tell them that they're improving.

As you say, you know nothing about radiation sickness.

Perhaps they are.

Captain. Yes?

Readings are rising in every compartment now.

Misha?

Comrade Suslov. What is it?

The radiation is going to kill us all.

The political branch gives you authority to approve any change of command.

Only in extreme cases of dereliction of duty.

Which this is.

He's suffering from radiation poisoning himself.

His judgment's impaired, or he would get the men off the boat.

When the moment comes, you will know it.


The weld has given way!

Core temperature is 450 degrees and rising!

Captain, the reactor repair has failed.

Captain.

DEMICHEV: Core temperature is 450 degrees and rising.

This is the captain.

All hands below decks. Prepare for emergency descent.

(ALARM BLARING)

All hands below! All hands below! Diving stations! Diving stations!

CREWMAN: Get the bulkhead doors shut!

I am not going back down! I am not going down!

All hands to diving stations. Move! Move!

Come on! We have to go now!

DMITRI: Andrei!

Andrei, no! No, Andrei! What are you doing?

VASILY: Diving now! Diving now!

DMITRI: Move! Get in! SERGEI: You've got to get in here!

Get in the hatch! That's an order! Move it!

SERGEI: We can't just leave him here!

DMITRI: Come on. SERGEI: He'll never make it!

Are the Americans still offering assistance on the emergency band?

The captain said not to... Check.

They're still there.

Why is he diving? He's going to cook us.

I won't go! Hey, Yevgeny!

No!

VADIM: Prepare the tank! Quickly!

Give it to me.

YEVGENY: This is bullshit! Put me down!

(SCREAMING)

Fire in missile silo!

(ALL SHOUTING)

Aft torpedo? Dmitri? Vasily? Come on.

Report.

Fire in aft torpedo. We have no communication.

Our fire team is suiting up. Activate the fire suppression system.

That will kill everybody in there.

Torpedoes go off, it'll kill everyone on the boat. They have breathing kits.

They don't. We took their oxygen canisters for the reactor team.

Give the fire team some time. Activate the system.

The primary was never connected. It has to be activated locally.

Go to nine and turn on the system.

You refuse my order?

I'll do it myself.

If you leave the command center, I will get help from the Americans, and you will be in no position to stop me.

If we can't handle it, I'll switch on the suppression system myself.

Get the fire out. And quickly!

Why aren't we diving?

Under the authority given to me by the Party, you are hereby removed from your post for dereliction of duty.

(MEN SHOUTING)

CREWMAN: Isolate electrical!

You're wasting time. Get a team to repair the reactor.


CREWMAN 1: Torpedo number eight!

CREWMAN 2: Stop the water! CREWMAN 3: No! No! Keep going!

Kornilov, tell the Americans we're evacuating the submarine and will require assistance.

Send the message!

U.S. destroyer. U.S. destroyer. This is Soviet submarine. Over.


Comrade Admiral.

General Vershinin, KGB.

I want to know if your man Vostrikov is a traitor.

All we know is that K-19 has broken off radio contact.

Broken radio contact with us.

A reconnaissance plane has spotted a destroyer shadowing K-19.

An American destroyer.

POLENIN: Vasily?

Vasily?

DEMICHEV: Captain Polenin to central command.

Repeat. Captain Polenin to central command.

Captain Polenin to central command.

Repeat. Captain Polenin to central command.

575 degrees and rising. Shut up!

You have no idea what you're doing.

Easy, easy.

VANYA: Who is it? It's Dmitri.

Easy.

DEMICHEV: Captain Polenin to central command. Repeat. Captain Polenin!

Do what you can, Vanya. It's all right.

DEMICHEV: Central command. Immediately!

(PANTING)

Five men have...

Captain Polenin, I have exercised my authority to transfer the boat to your command.

You're our captain, and always have been.

We've contacted the Americans.

All that is needed is your order to abandon ship.

Good.

Good.

Weapons don't belong here. Give them to me.

Give me the gun.

Give me the gun and the key for the handcuffs. Come on.

Give it to me. This boat's a family.

Of course, Captain.

And the key for the handcuffs, Suslov. Captain.

You betray your family.

You betray me.

You're under arrest. What?

The both of you. Get out of my sight!

Take their guns! Lock them in their quarters. Move!

SUSLOV: Please, it's treason! Misha! Misha!

The fire in compartment 10 has been extinguished.

The suppression system was not required.

Unfortunately, there was only one survivor.

Thank you.

Captain. Captain.

VOSTRIKOV: We have to dive.

This is the captain.

Don't order them, Captain. Ask them.

This is the captain.

Our situation is desperate.

The reactor repair has failed.

At any moment, we could have an explosion which could set off the warheads.

This would destroy the American ship

only a few kilometers from the NATO base.

Given the current level of tensions between our countries,

this could result in horrifying retaliatory attacks on the motherland.

We could dive and attempt to repair the reactor.

There are no guarantees.

I am standing by.

Secure both bulkhead doors.

(DOORS CLOSING)

SERGEI: Compartment 10 isolated. Compartment nine clear of smoke.

Manned and ready.

CREWMAN 1: Compartment eight serving the Soviet Union, Comrade Captain.

CREWMAN 2: Compartment seven standing by to do our duty, Comrade Captain.

CREWMAN 3: Compartment five manned and ready.

CREWMAN 4: Compartment four. We await your orders, Captain.

CREWMAN 5: Compartment one. We are with you, Comrade Captain.

Ready to dive, Captain. Dive the boat.

Dive the boat. Make our depth 300 meters. Keep five degrees.

Flood all main ballasts. POLIANSKY: Flood all main ballasts.

Electric motors full ahead together. CREWMAN 6: Full ahead together.

Keep five degrees bow down.

Quick, before we're cut out.


Radtchenko. Lieutenant Radtchenko.

Lieutenant Radtchenko, report.

Captain. Reactor temperature's 760 degrees and rising.

Lieutenant Radtchenko.

Vadim.

Where is he? He's inside.

(GROANS)

How long has he been in there?

Eighteen minutes. Eighteen minutes!

Wait. Captain! Captain, you can't go in without...

Secure the hatch!


Vadim!

I can't see! I can't see!

Let me help you. I have you. Captain, I'm sorry.

Open the hatch!

280 meters. Level off.

(THUMPING)

(BANGING)

Coming through.

970 degrees and holding, Captain.

VOSTRIKOV: Open the bulkhead door.

He got a terrible dose.

POLENIN: Who's going in next?

Captain. The temperature's falling.

He did it. He turned himself into a hero.

Surface the boat!

(WHOOPING)

Blow the main ballast! Get a rise in the planes.

Keep 15 degrees by the bow.

POLIANSKY: Motors at full ahead together.

You have the conn.

HELMSMAN: Full rise, 15 degrees by the bow.

POLENIN: I have the conn.

Signal the American captain as soon as we surface.

Tell him we require his assistance.

Yes, Captain. KORNILOV: Yes, Captain.

Up periscope. POLIANSKY: Periscope going up.

Men.

You have done your duty for the motherland.

The Party is proud of you.

I am...

I am proud of you.

Captain. Captain.

Yes, Vadim, I'm here.

The weld. Is it holding?

Yes, Vadim. The weld is holding.

You're a hero, Vadim. Do you hear?

You are a hero.

You are all,

all of you, heroes.


I had hoped one of our own boats would find us.

The radiation levels are rising too quickly.

I have asked the American captain

for his help.

Prepare to abandon the boat.

American destroyer bearing 0-4-5. Range, 2,000 meters.

Captain, I have a contact!

What the... Captain!

The boat could be in trouble.

What sort of trouble?

I've known Captain Vostrikov personally for half his life.

There isn't a submariner in the Navy whose loyalty I trust more.

More than his father's loyalty?

I never knew his father.

Captain. Captain.

When my father went to sea, he used to carry these great handfuls of dirt in his pockets.

"Bit of the motherland," he said.

He would rather die than betray his country.

Contact me from the bridge when the last lifeboat is loaded.

I'll sink the boat. The Americans won't get her.

That won't be necessary, Captain.

Our submarine, S270, has found us.


Yes.

Yes.

Confirm and out.

Reply from Moscow, Captain. Sent through S270.

Your request to remove the men from the boat is denied, Comrade Captain.

They're sending a freighter to tow us back to base.

Anything else?

They said...

They said to give the men plenty of fresh fruit.

I want my men off this boat. I am countermanding Moscow.

You know that it will be the end of your career.

They'll send you to the Gulag, like your father.

Well, it's a family tradition, isn't it?

Let's go, let's go, let's go!


I got you.

Easy. Easy.

Good! Good man. Good.

You must be decontaminated, do you understand?

We must make you clean.

It's cold. But you'll be warmer inside.

We must take your clothes off. We will decontaminate you and destroy the clothes, then you can go down below.

Take off your pants. Next!

Easy.

CREWMAN: Slowly, be careful there. This is your boat, Misha.

I lost my position, Yuri, but not my self-respect.

You lost both.

Where am I going? They're taking you across, Vadim.

I need my picture of Katya.

Where is it? VADIM: In my pocket.

Here you are.

There it is.

I can't see.

I can't see her.

(COUGHING)

All men accounted for, Captain.

Why didn't you take command when you had the chance?

Because what they did was wrong.

Prepare the tow, Captain.

Captain.

CREWMAN: Move all these men out. Move!

Go back.

Lev, you're a welcome sight.

Moscow thought you were defecting with your boat.

What? They want me to make a list of the men who are fit enough to testify. Testify. About what?

About you.

Alexei.

POLIANSKY: Make sure the lines are secure. Don't let her drift.

SAVRAN: Come on, you're going home. KORNILOV: Thank you, Doctor.

We did it. We're going home.


POLENIN: At every stage of this disaster, which came within moments of being a far greater disaster, the officers and crew did what had to be done.

Seven are now dead.

And nobody knows how many more are dying, or how fast.

These are the men who returned home to be interrogated, as if a crime had been committed.

Questioned, even while undergoing treatment for radiation poisoning.

Locked up and denied access to wives and families.

But they and their comrades saved K-19.

And maybe, just maybe, they saved all of you as well.

Thank you, Captain Polenin. POLENIN: One thing more, please.

Thank you... No captain in the Soviet Navy has ever been faced with such decisions.

The fate of the boat. The crew.

The fate of the world.

All in the balance.

(SIGHS)

The Navy is my life, and one thing I know, there can only be one captain of a ship.

The burden of command is on his shoulders and his alone.

None of you...

None of you has the right to judge Captain Vostrikov.

You weren't there. I was.

He was our captain.

He was my captain.

And it would be an honor to sail under his command again.

ANNOUNCER ON TV: East Germany has agreed to do what the West has been demanding it to do for more than a generation.

(PEOPLE CHEERING ON TV)

After opening up the Berlin Wall, the government has now announced it will hold democratic elections.

(PEOPLE SINGING ON TV)

(PEOPLE SHOUTING)


You're not so tall as I remember.

It's good to see you.

And you.

Please.

VOSTRIKOV: I'm glad you found me.

But today was, in fact, not very convenient.

No, no, it had to be today.

Your crew.

It was 28 years ago today.


POLENIN: Captain. A toast.

To the men still on patrol.

For their courage, I nominated these men

for the title, "Hero of the Soviet Union."

But the committee ruled

that because it was not wartime,

because it was merely an accident, they were not worthy of the title "hero."

What good are honors from such people?

These men sacrificed not for a medal,

but because, when the time came,

it was their duty.

Not to the Navy.

Or to the state.

But to us.

Their comrades.

And so...

To comrades.

To comrades! To comrades!