Lady Jane (1986) Script

Somerset! Somerset!

Save him!


Lord Jesus, save me!

Did he die well?

Yes, he died well. And now you are in his place.

As what?

As England's ruler, my Lord Duke.

Indeed.

What's that, my Lord?

In the last will of the King's late father, Henry VIII of famous memory, the succession is quite clearly lineated.

The line of his eldest sister, the Scottish line, ruled out.

So...

...one, his son, King Edward; two, his elder daughter, the Princess Mary; three, his younger daughter, the Princess Elizabeth; four...

...Frances, daughter of his younger sister; five, her daughter, Jane.

Surely an academic question. When the young King is married, has a son...

Exactly. When the young King is married.

The question is, to whom?


Ride on, coachman.


Excuse me. I'm Dr. Feckenham. I'm from the Princess Mary.

I have letters for the King. Out hunting. Catholics!

And for my Lord the Duke of Suffolk. Him, too.

Is there nobody here to receive me?


My Lady Jane?

I am Dr. Feckenham. I am confessor to the Princess Mary.

I know.

How do you do?

You're not out riding?

No.

Plato. In Greek.

It's not easy.

Don't you think so?

"The soul takes flight to the world that is..."

"...eternal..."

"...invisible..."

"...but there arriving, she is sure of bliss"

"and forever dwells in paradise."

In his writing, Plato tells of the death of Socrates, condemned for spreading pernicious religious doctrines to corrupt the young.

What conclusions do you draw?

If men believe things strongly, they may die for them.

What would you be prepared to die for, Lady Jane?

I would die to free our people from the chains of bigotry and superstition.

What superstition did you have in mind?

For example, the idea that a piece of bread can become the body of our Saviour, Father.

Did he not say at his last supper, "Take, eat, this is my body"?

He also said, "I am the vine, I am the door."

Was he a vine, a door?

Who has been teaching you to say such things?

Don't you think I could have thought them for myself?

I am sorry. Yes, indeed. You are quite clearly a most remarkable young lady.

And while we will disagree on many things, it is a privilege to talk to anyone whose love of learning shines like yours.

It...

It is my only pleasure...

...Dr. Feckenham.

Jane.

Oh. Mother.

How was the hunt?

Quite splendid, thank you, Jane.

Jane.

So there you are.

Yes, Father. This is Dr...

You should have been out with us. This is Dr. Feckenham.

Of course, to go out with your family, out riding, working up a sweat, fresh air, it's altogether far too base and brutish, isn't it?

Answer your father, Jane.

Mother, please.

You might think, Father, that the first born of the House of Suffolk might be considering her future in her sixteenth year, you might think.

Instead of poring over books!

She could be... Could be learning things that might be useful to a husband.

Father!

Don't you think so, Doctor?

Henry! The King.

What were you reading, cousin Jane?

Plato! Good morning, Dr. Feckenham.

Do you have the letters from my sister?

Her learning is an example to us all.


Your dancing measure, if you please.


- You know, my Lady... Yes.

It must be time to take your daughter up to London. Show her at Court.

How old is she?

Fifteen. There you are. Same age as the King.


She's been well educated.

That is very clear.

She can be... wilful.

She'll grow out of that.

And she has been brought up in the reformed religion.

Certainly.

Then I foresee a glittering future for your daughter, madam.


I had two brothers. Died.

In the same week.

Had a son.

Didn't reach six months.

Your handsome sons with their lovely wives.

Yes, and I have a third son.

Guilford.

They must be such a joy to you, John Dudley.

Three such fine...

...upstanding sons.

One more, one more.

Come on.

Guilford, let's go.

A shilling on the eight.

That was a seven. No, an eight.

That was a seven, damn you.

No!


Merry Christmas.

Did you play with puppets when you were a child?

I seem to have spent my whole life listening to sermons.

Better now.

Who is that man? Sir John Gates, captain of my guard...

Oh, Jane...

...I feel quite dreadful.

Sire? Edward, in God's name, what's the matter?

Follow me!

What do I do? What do I do?

Your Grace.

It's all right, Jane, Sir John.

I am recovered.

Better now.

My Lady Jane. My Lord Northumberland.

The King has sent me to inform you that he is completely recovered.

Well, I am glad.

So much so that there's no need for anyone to mention that he was ill at all.

I see. I'm glad.

You're asking me to lie.

To refrain from volunteering information.

It cannot be too hard to understand for a young person who reads Plato in Greek.

Lady Jane. Princess Mary is free to see you now.

Thank you.

She apologises. She was finishing a hand of trump.

Do you play cards? No. No, I don't.

You're wise. She's very good.

I see.

Why do you curtsy?

I am curtsying to the Host, my Lady. To Him that made us all.

I see.

So, God made you and the baker, apparently, made God.

Well.

Can this be my little cousin Jane? Ma'am.

Now, let me look at you.

How you've grown.

Well, then, embrace me.

And if I were you, I'd take care, little cousin Jane.

Madam, have you considered your daughter's future?

You know I have. And can I ask...?

I can see no reason why she should not marry Edward.

I can. What?

He's dying. What?

He will be dead... who knows, a month?

God rest his soul. Indeed.

What then?

There will not be another Roman Catholic on the English throne.

The country people don't agree. They still adhere.

They miss the Latin litanies and mysteries.

The ornaments and precious things.

Because before King Henry closed the monasteries, they were in the churches.

They could see them on the altars. I wonder where those things are now.

Which is why, madam, for you, and yes, for me as well, there must not be another Roman Catholic on the English throne.

If Edward dies without an heir... Then Mary's queen.

Her mother was divorced and Mary was named a bastard. Next in line's Elizabeth.

Whose mother, Anne Boleyn, was beheaded for treasonable adultery.

Behold, the next in line becomes my Lady, the Duchess Frances Suffolk, who would, of course, relinquish all her dues and rights in favour of her daughter, Jane.

Ah, Frances, there you are. Down, damn you, Jupiter.

Good Lord, are you still eating? Do you hear me, sir?

Afternoon, John. My Lord.

We were speaking of Jane's marriage, Henry.

It might be a matter of peculiar importance in the event of circumstances which well might arise.

Here. Here.

In fact, I suspect my Lord has someone in mind.

Perhaps he'd be good enough to tell me.

I don't think you've met my youngest and as yet unmarried son, Guilford.

He's a quiet and studious boy.

I imagine even now among his books or else at prayer.

More wine!

No more wine.

Hey, you! Because it's bedtime.

I want him out!

Out!

It's bedtime, Guilford.

Good morning, Mother, Father.

Jane, you know the Duke of Northumberland.

Indeed I do. My Lord.

Jane, as you know, the Duke has three fine sons.

Yes, I've been privileged to meet with Robert and...

John. Yes, John.

My third son is called Guilford. Guilford?

It was his mother's maiden name. I see.

Oh, Jane!

My darling little Jane.

My little girl, we're so proud of you. Oh, no.

Yes, yes. No. No.

Now, Jane, embrace my Lord the Duke.

No.

What is this? I order you.

My Lord, I am most honoured...

...naturally.

I'm sure your son is a most noble of young men, but I don't wish to marry anyone at present.

You don't wish to marry? No!

I wish it and your mother wishes it and the Duke wishes it.

And the King wishes you... No! That I do not believe!

You don't?

I don't believe that the King wants me to marry Guilford Dudley.

Ellen, please take your mistress to the gallery.

No! If you value your position in this house.

My Lady. No!

Stop her! Take her! Take her!

See reason!

No! Take her!

I will not! I won't!

I will not!

She will.

I'm sure her mother will...


Well?

So be it.


Well?

Well?

I just don't see why.

Then I must make you see.

You see, my cousin trusts me.

I must not betray that trust. Your Grace, the battle isn't won.

The battle started by your father must be carried on by you.

The reformation of your church is still incomplete, the danger that your country could relapse into a pit of popery still great.

I cannot tell you why it matters that my son should marry Jane.

All I can do is beg Your Grace to trust me.

Then you'd better fetch my men to get me dressed.

John.

I do know I'm dying.


You will not marry Guilford Dudley?

Without your family, what are you? No one. Nothing.

What makes you dare to think you can choose whom to obey?

My love! Yes, what?

Our daughter has a visitor.

Your Grace.

We would like to speak, madam, to our cousin Jane. Alone.

Alone.

My Lady Jane. No, no.

I wasn't whipped.

They had a boy. If I did something bad, they beat him in my place.

See? You should have been born heir to the throne.

Though, in a way it made it rather worse. You understand?

But it was his duty, as it was mine to suffer for his suffering in my stead.

As it is yours now to obey your parents and your King.

Why must you do what he tells you? Who?

John Dudley.

Because I trust him.

Look, I brought you something.

What is it?

A puppet.

You pull the cords and it dances.

Let me try.

Oh, look, it does. It works.

Of course it works.

Look, I can make it bow. So I should think.

Oh, Edward.

Oh, it's wonderful.

All better now?

All better now.

Now promise...

...that you'll marry him.

For me.


It's all right, Your Grace. I'm here.


Three days? Or four. Perhaps a week.

No more.

It must be longer. There must be some way.

No, the only thing is arsenic, which would keep him more or less alive, but in excruciating pain.

There's nothing else? Nothing.

So be it, then. My Lord...

Doctor...

...I must have the time.


Who are you? What do you want? Where are they?

Bastard! Where are they?

Where is he? Who?

In there.

Get out, you bastard! Get out!

Lord!

My Lord, you must come with us. Why? What for?

Clear the way!

Congratulations, my Lord. You're going to be married.

Who to?

You're not to wear black again!


God's teeth!

My dear Guilford.

She wants to see you.

Who does? Your betrothed.

What, now? Yes, now!

Please tell me this isn't... No.


I thought it right...

You may have heard I was unhappy about this match.

Yes. Yes, I did.

I worried that it would impede what's important to me, which is studying and prayer.

So I would prefer when this...

...when this is done, that we lived...

...shall we say as cousins, rather than as man and wife.

If that is what you wish. It is.

I should myself make something clear. Please do.

On the night I was informed of my translation into bliss, I'd attended several taverns, witnessed a bear-baiting and was in Southwark, sampling the pleasures of a lady of the night.

Thus far, I have to tell you, it had been a very good evening.

Still...

...duty calls.

Dearly beloved friends, we are gathered here in the sight of God and the face of His congregation, to join together this man and this woman in holy matrimony, which is an honourable estate instituted of God in paradise in the time of man's innocence and therefore not to be enterprised, nor taken in hand inadvisedly, lightly or wantonly to satisfy men's carnal lusts and appetites, like brute beasts that have no understanding, but reverently, discreetly, advisedly, soberly, and in the fear of God.


Ah, my Lady.

More.


Well, there we are. How long has he got to live?

Two weeks, three at the most. I see.

But has he yet declared his will?

The King will preserve the new religion. And his Council?

I'm sure that they understand how the triumph of the new faith has contributed to their position and wealth.

Plain sailing, then.

Frances, John, there you are.

Speaking of former monasteries, the King has put at the disposal of our children the old priory of Eversholt... for as long as they have need of it.

You mean, until we have need of them.

Indeed.

- Look, Dudley... Yes.

Are you sure your son's the right man for my daughter?

I can control him.

He can be controlled in matters that concern us, my Lord Duke.


My Lady... are you sure you understand?

No, no, there's no need.


It's beautiful.

Don't you think it's beautiful?

Jane?

Jane?

What's the matter?

Better now.


We oughtn't to get too far behind the rest.

Whoa, there! Whoa! Whoa, there!

What's this?

I have no idea.

Good day.

Is there...

...anything you want?

My wife and I have come to stay here at the priory. It's our great pleasure.

As a token of our...

You know what that is? Yes.

You've been branded. Why?

Begging, I presume. That's right. No tribute.

We want our land back!

It's not our fault, so leave my wife and I alone.

Leave it!

Leave it! Leave it!

Ride on.


Mrs. Ellen.

It's lovely. Is there anything to eat?

Yes, of course.

We're on our own.

We won't be tomorrow. What?

The Mayor of Hertford is to dine with us in the refectory.

Just the Mayor? Accompanied by several aldermen.

God's teeth!

Glass goblets. Yes. A present from your father.

Made in Venice. Yes, I know.

They're very pretty, but they do have this tendency to break.

Oh?

Don't you dare.


What did those men at the gates want? I don't know... Food.

Have they no farms? I'm sorry?

Why were they idle? Tell me, did you see his chest?

Yes. It was marked. No, it wasn't.

It was branded, the mark burnt into him with a red-hot iron.

Do you know why? Because he'd been caught begging.

Can you think how he may have fallen into beggary?

The land he used to farm, on which he had much work to do, belonged to poor monks in monasteries, who allowed poor people to grow food.

Until men like our fathers stripped the monasteries, fenced in the common land, drove the peasants from their fields and passed unholy laws branding them for beggary!

They threw all that money back at you... Money!

Do you know what's happened to the value of money?

No.

What's that?

A penny. No, it isn't... It's a shilling.

It can't be. Shillings are made of silver. Should be.

Used to be... But not now.

Which is why a shilling isn't worth a shilling any more.

You've really no idea what's going on, have you?

I know the priests were all corrupt. No doubt.

They told the people to worship icons. That concerns me less.

You're talking of your soul. No, you are talking of your mind!

I wonder if you and the reformers can convince yourselves that the nature of the sacraments is more important than whether those who receive them live or die!

The brain is a brittle organ.

The slightest pressure and it snaps... if it isn't wrapped up in a little heart.

I shall have them arrange another bedroom for me.

They won't think very much of that. I couldn't care less what they think!

What right have you? You haven't done a thing!

Why don't you go to Court? Do something about all these things?

Because there isn't any point!

Because it wouldn't work. It never does.

Dear God and all his saints, what am I doing here?


What do you want?

I want to say I'm sorry. Doesn't matter.

Yes, it does.

This is not your fault. That's true.

Well, then...

Goodnight.

Explain it to me.

What?

What you believe. The schism, the new learning, the nature of the sacraments.

Do you really want to know? I really want to know.

Well...

It's our belief...

...that faith only saves.

That, as Christ Jesus says, his sons shall come to God if they believe in him.

Not by the Church?

Not by the Church.

Yes.

And...

...that all superstitions, ornamental relics...

...and icons...

...and images...

...and...


Go on. Go on?

With what you were doing. With what I was saying?

Not just now.

What do I do?


When did you know?

I didn't.

It just happened.

Did you know about it?

What? What we've just done.

Well...

...only in terms of the broadest general principles.

Unlike you.

Not exactly.

What?

You're referring to my lady of the night.

Well, yes, I was.

Passed out. Who was?

I did.

Got to the bed...

...and then...

Blank.

Total failure. Terrible embarrassment.

Why are you crying?

Don't you know?

No, of course I don't.

I was...

...the first.

My father's will is clear.

But, Your Grace, the Princess Mary will restore your realm to popery.

She is my sister.

It is the duty of a Christian king to set aside the prejudices of the blood in favour of the greater good of God and country, or else... for our life on earth is short. He will answer for it at the seat of judgement.

Have you a draft of this devise?

"The Lady Jane and her heirs, male,"

"the throne of England, Ireland, France."

Yes.

Yes.


Oh, John.

Your Grace?

I want this to be over.

I want the Privy Council called and a small force ready to take Princesses Mary and Elizabeth as soon as this is countersigned.

Please!

Please, now? Please! Can we?

Yes.

Yes, let him die.

So, where are they? The Mayor and his aldermen?

Oh, I sent word we were unwell.

And I told them to give all the food away to those people on the road.

All, all away.

Who is this woman? Mm?

I mean, I don't know who you are.

No more do I.

All right.

What do you want? What do you mean?

If you could have any wish? Love, to be with you.

No, no, not for us.

Well, if I could have anything, I would wish...

...our country to remain true to the faith of God as revealed in the Scripture.

Good.

Then, it's done.

Now, my turn.

Go on, ask me. What?

What I want.

What do you want? I think you know.

I want a world where men aren't branded because they can't grow their food.

Go on.

Well...

...it's done.

So...

What else, then?

Death to all bishops, cardinals and popes.

An end to their power over men and women's souls.

It's done. And the power of kings, dukes and princes over their bodies and minds.

Done.

A world where the comfort of a few is not bought by the misery of many.

And where children are not beaten and cajoled but loved and nurtured.

Where men shall live in peace on God's earth.

Where every man and woman might feel half, a quarter...

Oh...

...the merest speck of what I feel for you.

Then, it's done. It's done.

It's... Done. It's done.

Now, my love, was that so hard?

What on earth is going on?

Ah... Mrs. Ellen.

Yes...

...a most unfortunate occurrence.

An accident. You see, what happened was...


We've forgotten something. What?

A real shilling. What?

A shilling really worth a shilling.


No, no... Please!

Don't! Jane!

What does your father want with us? Don't know.

He must have some reason why he wanted us to marry, some...

...some scheme.

Don't know. Why do you ask?

Because he frightens me.

Because I love his son.

I think his... His deeds are not his nature.

Guilford, nothing can ever justify what he's done.

Not even if what he is doing is to keep your new church safe from popery?

Guilford...

...must it always be like that?

Can the strong never be good?

Who knows?

Are you strong enough to go? Go where?

Away. Beyond their reach, where their touch can't tarnish us.

Would that be strong?

You see...

...I just don't think our parents...

Yes?

...will let us stay like this.

You have in your hands...

...the King's will.

You say to sign it might be treason? My Lord, I merely...

His will, without which we shall see his realm restored to popery!

And all the offices and sacraments and rites of his most holy Church restored to the Mass priests and the conjurors of Rome!

Not to mention, my Lords, the properties.

Will anyone say treason once again?


Winchester.

Thomas Canterbury.

My Lords, we should call the King's two sisters to his bedside.

You mean they're gone?

Both of them? Yes.

Mary to Norwich. Elizabeth, we don't yet know.

But surely we must turn back now? Now we have no choice but to go on.

But, Dudley...

...obviously the Princess knows, so you can't possibly...

Exactly. Mary knows. How? Somebody told her.

Somebody who can tell her everything... if she succeeds.

Our boats are burnt, ma'am. There's no turning back.

My Lord...

...the King is dead.

Long live Queen Jane.

So, then, we will. Oh, yes, we will.

We'll fly. We'll fly away.

At last...

We will be nothing... nobody... each other's.

Who are you? What do you want?

I told you, they're asleep. They can not be awakened.

My Lady Jane. Who calls for her?

You must now come with us. Who sent you?


My Lords...

...with regret, I must announce the death of His Majesty, King Edward VI.

But let us not forget, even at this time...

...our joy at his virtuous life and the care he took to keep his realm free from the intrigues and blandishments of Rome.

Shortly before his death, the King made a declaration, which has been witnessed by his Council and marked with his great seal.

And, my Lady, His Majesty named Your Grace heir to his crown.

"Your Grace"...? All those who would deny your claim or fail in all ways to defend Your Majesty, even unto death, shall be judged as traitors.

Long live Queen Jane! Long live Queen Jane!

Queen Jane.

Walk, Jane.

I can't. I won't.

Jane, walk!


Your Majesty will try the crown?

This isn't mine. It is, Your Grace.

It is not my right. Then whose right is it?

Your Grace will want to see it fits. I don't. I can't.

And if it suits Your Majesty.

And so it does. And so it does.


Now another shall be made. Another? Why?

To crown your husband's head as well.

Guilford!

Take me out of here!

My Lords, the Queen desires that you withdraw.

Wake me, wake me!

This is a nightmare! Wake me!

He wants to make you King. Who does?

Your father. This is what he wants, for you to be his puppet and me yours.

I didn't... I had no idea.

You swear?

Well, of course I swear! What do you take me for?

What am I to do?

You said that I should seek to cure the commonwealth.

Then you said nothing's to be done and let's fly away.

Before we met I could feel things deeply, but I didn't think.

You thought, you studied. I know, but...

Jane, we're like a coin. How?

With a head on one side and a lion on the other. Heart of England.

And one side alone is worth nothing, but together, we might stay untarnished.

The strong can still be good.

I couldn't care less if I'm King, but I want you to be Queen.


Now, my love, was that so hard?

My Lord Northumberland. Your Grace.

You have told us we are Queen. By your late cousin's will.

And we may issue our commands, and it is your duty to obey them?

Of course, Your Majesty.

Well, then...

We want...

I want...

...a real shilling.


By the grace of God, and the will of his late servant Edward, of the most blessed memory, be proclaimed Jane, Queen of England, Ireland and France, with all the royalties and pre-eminences to the same belonging, Defender of the Faith, Supreme Head of the Church.

Where's Princess Mary?

Mary has sent a letter.

She proclaims herself Queen. That's no surprise.

Indeed not, but it does require an answer.

Do you mean a letter? No, an army.

How quickly could you raise a force for Norfolk?

Depends how large. My Lord, that does seem...

To arrest one woman with dubious title to the throne...

Well?

Three days.

My Lords.

My Lords, this is a list of our commands.

We wish first for you to call a Parliament to repeal the laws relating to the branding of unfortunates forced into beggary.

Instead, two, we command the return of all the lands and properties, which our uncle liberated from the monasteries, for the use and cultivation of the common people... in perpetuity.

And third, we wish a school to be endowed.

It will teach the children of the poor, not by beating or cajolement, but by love and nurture.

And we put its founding into our father's care...

...who will commence this stewardship at once.

And fourth...

What's this?

It is your commission for your father, ma'am, to lead your army into Norfolk to repel the traitor Mary.

What?

The Council's decision was unanimous! This is no decision!

Your Grace, the Council considered... It is not "the Council", it is our Council.

It has not considered how I feel.

You are our father. We have important work for you to do.

We would like him... We demand that he remain with us.

For we have need of him.

Jane! You see, unless you agree- This is absurd!

Who else do you propose should lead- Jane.

I told you my father was honest. Yes. So?

So let him prove it.

Send him to defend your throne.

Ask him.

My Lord...

...I will sign this if the words "our father Henry, Duke of Suffolk" are struck out and "our well-trusted councillor, John, Duke of Northumberland" put in.


I am your servant, ma'am.

Then, I wish you Godspeed.

"I can..."

"I can control him."

"He can be controlled."

What do you mean? I mean... You stupid girl!

Foolish, wilful little girl!

But after all...

...we are the Queen.


Guilford, listen to this.

"He has sent me to bind up the broken-hearted,"

"to free the captives"

"and open prison doors."

Why not?

Release.

Sir Thomas Holcroft, arrested with the Duke of Somerset for treason.

Release.

Go on.

The Mayor of Norwich, incarcerated by my Lord Northumberland...

Of course, release.

Your Grace... With all respect, I must insist...

Masters, you are free, by orders of Her Majesty Queen Jane.


His Excellency, the Spanish Ambassador.

Your Grace.

Your Excellency. We regret we only have a moment...

It has been several days.

More important matters were calling. Why, of course, Your Grace.

My people live in poverty and misery. Their need is the greater.

There's the matter of the wardrobe. Yes, I see.

I see.

Mistress, what is this? My Lord, this is the Royal Wardrobe.

Yes, but why...? The Queen is giving it away, my Lord.

What?

To warm the wretched and to clothe the comfortless, my Lord.

Your Grace.

This is the Under-Treasurer of your Privy Purse.

I'm from the Royal Mint, Your Grace.

It's our shilling.

It's for Guilford Dudley.

Take me to my brother.

Desertions, in their hundreds!

Overnight they melt away and no one joins, whatever pay we offer.

The Council must send reinforcements! I'll go and see them. They're in session.

It was so foolish, Guilford.

Whoever thought that he should lead a force to Norfolk?

They will hate him there.

Jane, come with me. Where to?

Council Chamber. I must get dressed.

Love, there isn't any need.


All gone?

All gone.

All those great lords and bishops with their solemn pledge to serve me even unto death.

Nine days. You should have kept the keys.

So now we're really on our own.

Now we're really ruling England.

What do you want?

I want...

...no branding for the starving.

Happiness and comfort.

Peace. It's done.

I want no popes, no cardinals, no parents who abuse their children.

Then it's done.

I want...

I want this to be over.

Done!

The Council have met at Baynard's Castle.

They have pronounced Northumberland a traitor and Princess Mary, Queen.

What a relief.

Look...

Look, I-

Look, Jane- I ought to say...

Father, may we go home?

Father, may we go home?

I will...

I will... try to make amends.

The proverb says, "A wonder lasts nine days, "and then the puppy's eyes are open," so what happens on the tenth day?


Jane Dudley. Yes.

You must come with me. She'll need some things.

Indeed.

No! No!

Jane! Jane! No! No!

I will not!

I will not! I will not!


Well...

...still...

...they didn't find our shilling.

Receive the traitor, John Dudley. You must follow me, my Lord.

I am sorry.

God save Queen Mary. God save Your Grace!


These are my prisoners.

Honest men, incarcerated by my brother's officers.

But, by the grace of God, and in the name of His son Jesus Christ, they are prisoners no more, as no man shall be, if with honest heart he spurns all heresy...

...and does confess the true religion!

Reprise for those who return to Rome.

Ah...

Well, then...

...hail Mary.

What?


Guilford, where are you?

Love?

Why, Guilford!

You have betrayed me. How?

You will imperil your soul for a few more years of life!

It doesn't look so miserable when you're about to lose it.

A living dog is better than a dead lion...

...you may find.

I wasn't very good at it, you see. What do you mean?

I misjudged the men.

I misjudged you.

How so? Do they let you see her?

No.

Who'd have thought the black sheep, the most prodigal of prodigals, would find a love so simple and so pure?

You see, what I believed... was that a man, without the intervention of priest or pope, can look on God and say, "Lord, here I am."

But...

...how can I look Him in the eye...

...when I can hardly bear to turn my face to you?

Why did you shame me, Guilford?


It's not your fault.

Perhaps it showed a want of prudence...

...but you are very young.

You will both be tried, you know, in a few months' time, I think, when things have cooled, and naturally you will be condemned to death.

But, of course, I have the power of reprieve, which at present I intend to use.

With no conditions? If you promise not to usurp me again!

Your Grace, I am covered with the deepest shame and guilt and can only throw myself on your great...

Now, now, now.

Now, that's enough of that.

I want to show you something.

Philip, Prince of Spain, son of Charles the Emperor.

The portrait is by a Signor Titian.

Why, it's a...a good picture.

Yes.

You married in the first flush of your youth.

You're lucky.

Now you must go. I have ambassadors to see.

There is one further mercy... Say nothing to change my mind.

My husband...

You didn't heed my warning, little cousin Jane.

Your Grace, His Excellency. Of course.

So, then, Excellency, is there any news?

The Emperor is delighted with the prospect of his son being honoured with your hand, Your Grace.

Then tell him I am delighted, too.

May I ask, was that the young usurper? Yes, it was.

Your Grace, the Emperor is not delighted that there remains within your realm...

I have told Your Excellency, no.


I thought...

...you see, I wondered, now that we're together, how on earth are we going to fill the days?


She loves him. What?

I saw her looking at his portrait, and I saw me looking up at you.


I can't believe it. What's that?

We're here together, safe.

You're mad! Where are you going? I'm not mad.

Where are you going? All right! I'll tell you.

I'm going to Leicester, and then to Coventry.

And from there to London, where our main force...

...will join up with the rebel armies from Kent and from Devon.

My love, don't go.

Just leave it as it is. We're alive.

So England has a Spanish king, so a bitter woman is made happy, and we are alive!

No.

No, there cannot be a Spanish king on the English throne.

Henry, I don't believe... I owe it to our daughter.

You can't mean to restore Jane to... I owe it to my daughter!

She has need of me.

To your horses, quickly!

What's happening?

Can't tell.

There's a lot of soldiers out there.

Must mean some of the rebels have reached London.

I just can't bear not knowing.

I overheard the jailer say you could see the fires from Southwark.

And he spoke of a great duke that rode from Warwickshire.

This is madness! No, it isn't.

It has a logic to it. What?

It is your father making his amends.

Your Majesty, His Highness Prince Philip will set sail the instant he learns there is no threat of further civil discord.

Or, more accurately, no longer any focus for such discord.

Such as one now inhabiting this tower, ma'am.

Ma'am, I cannot put it any plainer.

If you want to marry Philip, Jane Grey and her husband must both die.

Your Grace, I am just the message bearer.

So, Excellency, I...

Tell me, I wonder if these children would be less a threat if they embraced the true religion?

Less.

So, is there any news, Sir John?

The Duke of Suffolk was arrested by the forces of the Crown two hours ago at Temple Bar.

I am sorry.

Who did the rebels call for? Did they call for anyone?

Yes, my Lord. They shouted for Queen Jane.

Jane Dudley, Guilford Dudley, you have been found guilty of high treason.

The sentence of the court is that you, Jane Dudley, be beheaded within the precincts of the Tower.

And Guilford Dudley, that you be taken from that place to Tower Hill, where your head shall also be struck from your body.

"The soul takes flight to the world that is invisible,"

"but there arriving, she is sure of bliss."

This is the Queen's confessor... Jane!

Guilford! You promised to be silent, sir!

Why, Dr. Feckenham.

So, you remember me. Why have you brought him here to me?

To help you to decide if the next time you leave this room will be the last.

Which it will be, unless I can persuade you to renounce your heresy.

She promised! No conditions!

That was before your father led an insurrection in your name.

Will you talk to me?


There isn't any point.

How many are the sacraments?

There are two, the sacraments of baptism and of the Last Supper.

No, there are seven.

The sacraments of baptism, confirmation, Eucharist, penance, holy orders, matrimony, and last unction.

Then, tell me, in what scriptures find you that?

Then, tell me, how may a Christian come to God?

By believing in His name and by no other means.

What? Is nothing else to be required? No.

Speak of the sacrament of Eucharist.

Do you not receive the blood and the body of our Lord?

No, I do not. Did not our Saviour say...?

Our Saviour said, "I am the vine, I am the door."

Was he the vine? Was he a door?

You are right, my Lady, and the Queen is wrong.

I'm sorry?

How can I... How could I score across a faith so pure and firm and resolute?

At such a time, indeed, there is no point.

But I promise you, I will be with you to the end.

If at any time...

Otherwise, we shall not meet again.

No. No!

We shall not.

For, unless God turns your heart, you shall burn in hell for all eternity.

I have done all I can.

He came to me first.

Without your strength, I'd never have been able to stay firm.

Stay firm? For what?

For the sake of my immortal soul.

Oh, yes! And for the sake of our nine days.

To keep their memory untarnished...

...unbetrayed.

They brought you here and told you to be silent, in the hope that I'd think they had broken you.

But they got it wrong.

I'd never have been able to stay true without you here.

So without each other, we'd both be alive this time tomorrow.

Oh, but we will.

We will have taken flight to the world that's invisible, where we're sure of bliss.

Where we will dwell in paradise. Yes.

Please...

...for an hour.

Whatever may happen to their souls, in the flesh, they have just a night left.

What harm to leave them for a while?


So, then, we will.

Oh, yes, we will. We'll fly.

We'll fly. Away beyond their reach.

So far... That their touch can't tarnish us.

And at last we will be...

Nothing.

Nobody.

Each other's.

Only this time, forever.


My Lady.

Let them.

Next time I see your face, I want it for eternity.


I promised you and I repeat my promise.

Up to the end.

Tell me... Please, I want to know.

Your husband was taken from his room by the Lord Lieutenant of the Tower...

...through the Bulwark Gate, followed by the sheriffs, up to Tower Hill.

He was led through all the people...

...to the scaffold steps.

Just three or four.

And when he'd climbed them, he turned...

...held the rail, and addressed the people, asking God's forgiveness.

Took off his hat and coat, and his collar, and forgave the executioner, who told him to step upon the straw before the block itself, and placed his head within the crevice of the block.

And when he was ready, threw wide his arms.

And the headsman's axe came down.

It was a single stroke. He can have felt no pain.

God will requite you for your kindness, sir.

Do you forgive me, my Lady?

Willingly. Please stand upon the straw.


Kneel, please, my Lady.

Lay you down.

Where...where is it? Where is it?

What...what do I do?


Guilford.

And now, Your Grace?

Ma'am?

I am going to meet my husband...

...with whom I am in love, you see.

Ah-hm.


"The soul takes flight to the world that is invisible..."

"...but there arriving, she is sure of bliss..."

"...and forever dwells in paradise."