Man Wanted (1932) Script

Miss, I can't wait any longer.

I'm sorry.

Oh .. I can't wait any longer. I'm sorry.

I tell you I have an appointment with the editor.

And I tell you the editor is in conference.

But the store sent me up to demonstrate how to row this.

Row it? What is it, a boat?

It's a rowing machine. The latest deluxe ball-bearing model.

It's the best little muscle builder on the market.

Just the thing to pep up a tired editor.

It does away with brain fog and ..

It joggles your memory and .. Yes, yes. I'll believe you.

But I tell you the editor is in conference.

C-O-N-F-E-R-E-N-C-E. Conference!

You get me? Yes, I get it.

But is there any reason why I can't .. Alright, alright, alright.

[ Buzzer ]

I'm busy. Darling.

[ Buzzer ]

I told you I'm busy, now don't disturb me anymore.

[ Door knocks ]

Good heavens, Lois. How do you stand it?

What, being an editor? The whole racket.

Telephones, buzzers. Crazy-looking people.

It's all part of the game.

And I love it.

[ Door knocks ]

Come in.

Well Harper, I can't see anybody else now. I'm going out to lunch.

Make out this contract. I'll sign it when I get back.

And tell Fields I'll see him at 2:30.

I want to go over those drawings with him.

Yes, Mrs Ames .. anything else?

No, that's all. That's all. That's all.

Sweetness .. you see what happens when you take me to lunch.

Nobody has a chance.

Hey, you've changed your office, haven't you.

I hardly recognise it.

You should come down oftener and see where your busy little wife works.

You're a swell girl, Lois.

Don't you ever resent having a rich loafer for a husband?

Never.

Come on .. let's go.

Shush, wait, wait, wait.

[ Door knocks ]

Mrs Ames. What is it?

A salesman from French & Sprague left these for you.

He insisted you wanted them right away.

Good gracious, the rowing machine.

Where is he? Oh, he's gone.

I didn't want to disturb you. I didn't know.

I forgot to tell you.

I phoned them myself.

Now call back and tell the salesman to come tomorrow afternoon.

Alright, I'll tell him. No, no.

Tell him to come tomorrow evening.

I'll have plenty of time then and he can give a complete demonstration.

Very well.

Well, you see.

This one is equipped with our special little-giant spring.

Can you run races on them?

Why sure, you can do anything on them.

Let's see. Yeah, let's see.

Alright.

The sap.

Come on, it's time for the picture show.

How is that?

See, it gets going under its own momentum.

Well, where are they?

They said you could have the last jump.

Oh even the kids are razzing us.

I guess we're a couple of flops.

Yeah.

The closest I came to making a sale was a pair of BBDs.

The guy actually asked for them.

Well, what happened?

Couldn't find the right size.

Why didn't you ask the nearest sales clerk?

I did. She just blushed and walked away.

Hey, you think the management is wise to us yet?

Well, we only got the job because you're an All-American.

That proves the value of a college education.

Hey, hey. The boss.

Oh, Mr Sherman. Yes, sir?

You must work tonight. Certainly.

I want you to take one rowing machine .. Rowing machines? Say ..

I used to use these little gears four hours a day when I was in training.

I imagine you did.

Better let me take that machine out, Mr Walters. I can ..

Strip it for customers and demonstrate the movements that do the most good.

I'm afraid that couldn't be arranged.

The customer is the editor of the 400 Magazine.

The 400 Magazine?

Say, that nest is harder to crash than a movie studio.

I ought to know. I was over there yesterday.

He won't let you in even after he's sent for you.

I'm afraid you've jumped at conclusions.

The editor of the 400 Magazine is a lady.

Huh?

Oh, oh, oh.

Mr Sherman. Front, please.

Sherman.

Be there at 9 o'clock and ask for Mrs Ames. - Yes, sir.

As you perhaps know, Mrs Ames is very prominent and influential woman.

It means more than just the selling of one of these machines.

If she takes one .. and you can convince her that she's satisfied.

We'll make some of the best advertising matter out of it we've ever had.

So watch your step, my boy. It's a big chance for you if you put it over.

Well, thanks for the chance, Mr Walter.

I think you should be fairly able to convince the lady.

Well, what's funny?

Oh I was just picturing you tonight.

Putting on that whole personality.

I wish you'd give my personality a rest.

Well, it will need a rest where you're taking it tonight.

How do you know so much about it?

I'm an expert on those big, strong Femmy editors.

I got one for a cousin.

Does she look like you?

She's a little taller and a little broader across than narrow, but ..

She hasn't got my charm.

I don't see the joke.

Alright. Remember smart guy. I warned you.

So if you're figuring on selling one of those babies anything.

Make her keep the door open.

You got to stop reading those True Confession magazines.

Well a lot of guys go wrong in a Ford Coupe.

But you have to pick a rowing machine.

So.

You see Lois, it's all wrong.

You work all day when you should be playing.

I play all day when I should be working.

Well, I love my work, and you love your Polo.

But the office is no place for a woman like you.

Why don't you chuck it?

I seem to remember having asked that question at least three million times.

I don't think I could get along without the silly old magazine.

It's in my blood.

I love it the way all my people did.

Carrying it on for them is, is like some sort of a trust.

You don't really mind, do you?

Not if it makes you happy. You make me happy.

You never interfere.

Freedom is the only basis or a successful marriage.

I know how I'd feel if you made me stop the things I like.

I've got to get back.

Busy working wife goes back to sweatshop while husband loafs in Speakeasy.

Silly. Why shouldn't you loaf if you want to?

Bye, sweet. Bye.

Waiter. Yes, sir?

I'm expecting a phone-call.

When it comes I'll take it in a private room.

I understand, sir.

You'd better drop me here, Ruth.

Don't be silly, darling.

Well I won't have you making an express wagon out of your car.

I'm not proud.

But you can't be dropping delivery boys and rowing machines ..

In front of offices. It's ridiculous.

Oh, it's different when you're the boy.

Besides, I'll wait for you.

I may be demonstrating this thing for hours.

To a woman. Ruth, it's business.

I don't see why we're engaged.

We'd better have a talk about that.

About our engagement? Yeah.

You don't love me.

Don't be silly .. here we are.

I thought you were different at dinner.

Listen, kid. It isn't fair to you to be engaged.

Why not?

Well, that night we were all swanked up and I talked you into it.

Who am I to be engaged to any woman?

Do you know something?

You were just fooling, but it's true.

If you hadn't been swanked that night, we wouldn't be engaged.

I knew you had brains. I knew you'd see it that way.

Why, of course I do.

Seeing you swanked was what made me fall in love with you.

The swell way you carried your liquor.

Any boy that can get away with what you did so politely, well ..

I want him for life. Oh.

Is your mind at rest now?

Perfectly.

There is certainly nothing to be gained by using it.

Goodnight, sweet.


Come in.

Well?

I'm from French & Sprague with the rowing machine.

There's no reason why you can't deposit that thing on the ground and sit down.

Thanks.

Well, I guess I'd better be opening up the machine.

That's quite an idea.

Are you pretty strong in the back muscles?

I have made no effort to arouse your interest in my back muscles.

Oh, I just wanted to adjust the machine for you, madam.

Okay, Harper.

I think we'll hold this for further consideration.

Now let's get on with the letters. Mrs Ames.

Here is the man with the rowing contraption.

Oh.

I'll be with you in a moment.

You don't mind waiting, I hope?

No. Not a bit.

What next, Harper?

Cross and Eastman.

Oh yes.

Yes. The serial rights.

Oh .. thank you.

Hmm. Now, let's see.

Gentlemen.

Regarding your request for the English serial rights to the Garrett novel.

I regret to inform you that a clause in the author's contract.

I'm afraid this racket annoys you.

The racket does, but not the noise.

In case I'm not clear.

I have a habit of gazing into space when I'm thinking.

I'm terribly sorry. I didn't realize.

Now, now. Don't flounder.

Now Harper, where were we?

A clause in the author's contract. Oh yes, yes, yes.

Prohibits us from disposing of the rights ..

In foreign countries.

Without his approval.

Unfortunately the gentleman is now in China and out of communication.

Yours truly.

Hard to set up, huh?

No. I was just ..

How is your back?

I'll show you in just a moment.

No. I mean, how strong do you want me to make this thing pull?

I know what you meant.

And I might row it for you.

To .. the American Paper Company.

Sorry Mrs Ames, but I can't take any more.

Why not?

I understood we were to stop at eight. It's after nine, now.

And I've broken an appointment every evening this week.

But.

But you are paid overtime.

I know, but I can't give up every night.

But I'm swamped with work.

Just stay tonight and I'll make other arrangements tomorrow.

Afraid I can't.

Why Miss Harper, please be reasonable. Whom else can I get at this hour?

I'm sorry to inconvenience you, but I simply cannot break another appointment.

I see.

Very well.

Goodnight.

Shall I report in the morning?

Only to the cashier. Goodnight.

Well.

Well.

I wonder if ..

I can't look at your machine now. I'm terribly sorry.

Oh, that's alright.

What will you do, Mrs Ames? Huh?

About your secretary? I don't know. Confound that woman.

I'd be glad to help.

No. I'm afraid .. If you need a stenographer ..

Are you one? Not exactly, but ..

I used to take my lecture notes in college in shorthand.

I'm no good on the machine, but ..

I could come down early in the morning and give my notes to one of your girls.

Oh no, I couldn't let you do that. But why not? You're in a jam.

Let me pay you for the work.

I'll let you buy the rowing machine.

Well, we might try.

Sit down.

What's your college? Harvard. - Really?

My husband is a Harvard man, too.

Shall we start? Fine.

Thanks. There you are.

This is to the American Paper Company.

15 Worth Street.

The city.

Gentlemen.

In going over your invoices, I find ..

Too fast? No. Step on it.

Great.

Going over your invoices, I find they do not tally with the records on our books.

Will you look at this matter immediately and give it your earliest attention.

Thank you.

Will you have one? Thanks.

Do you drink?

Why, thanks.

I am enquiring into your habits. Are they steady?

I'm rolling around all I can on my present salary.

Perhaps I'd better leave well enough alone then.

I should say not.

I don't think you understand.

I'm sizing you up for a job. Oh.

Awfully nice of you Mrs Ames, only .. Only what?

Well, it's alright to ingratiate oneself into a man's office. It's business.

We started casually, but that can be remedied.

Of course.

You see, I have been having trouble with secretaries.

The work is so uncertain. It needs a man.

Understand, our relations will be purely of a business nature.

Of course, Mrs Ames.

It pays fifty a week and may turn into something better.

That of course, will be up to you.

Well, I certainly appreciate the chance, Mrs Ames. - Good.

Oh, here we are.

Shall I expect you tomorrow morning? Fine. Thank you.

Goodnight, Mrs Ames.

Goodnight, Mr Sherman.

[ Door knocks ]

Come in, dearie.

Alright. Hold your horses.

Why did you have the door locked?

I thought I'd better. The women didn't know you were out.

Did you make the grade?

I sold the machine.

If you ask me those night sales are in the nature of a recovered fumble.

Don't let your imagination get the better of you.

Hey, did you come home emotional?

Maybe.

I'm on the staff of the 400 Magazine.

On her staff?

On the editorial staff, yes.

What a man.

Can't you get it through your fat head ..

That today there are just as many serious-minded women in business as men.

If you meet them, you don't treat them like you're at a party.

Well, what did you do?

I didn't talk to her any differently than I would to a man.

You were all alone with her? Well, what of it?

Well, why didn't you?

Why should I? Didn't she look good enough?

Well to simplify matters for you, she didn't.

What did she look like?

What did she look like?

You about described her this afternoon.

Ha-ha .. Hercules Hattie?

Something like that.

How did she part her beard?

Hey. Let's treat her with a little respect. I'm working for her.

Hey, what's the old girl's name? It's Lois Ames, isn't it?

I'll bet she's a bird in a rowing machine.

Goodnight, dear.

Freddie.

If you tell another one, I'll roll on the floor.

Well listen, listen.

Did you ever hear the one about the old witch?

Here! What Cinderella lost her shoe?

Oh, Lois! Hello there.

Will you wild Indians be quiet?

Let a poor working girl sleep?

Oh Lois, this husband of yours is killing us.

He's killing me, too.

Now will you play bridge or make love or something.

Just let me sleep.

Now come on down, darling. Give the old office a rest for a day.

No. I can't really, sweet.

Go up and tell her we're sorry.

Righto. As soon as I finish this.

I don't see how she does it.

She works all day and sleeps all night.

She gets the habit from Freddie.

No, no. My vices are inimitable.

I call business for women a silly fad.

Better talk her out of it. Talk her out of it?

Oh no. Got to be liberal. I'd hate to have her talk me out of Polo.

And besides, the magazine isn't a fad with Lois.

It's a tradition. Handed down to her from her grandfather.

It's one of those, you know, "I've got to carry on" things.

It's the apple of her eye. And what are you, Freddie?

I'm the cinder in her other eye.

I guess that makes me the alternative.

Hi, boss.

[ Door knocks ]

Who's there?

Your big boy. Come along.

Freddie, I just can't go down there tonight.

Well, I just came to tell you that we're sorry.

But listen.

I'll help keep them quiet. You're a sweet.

Comfy?

Perfect? Hard day?

Terrible. So did I.

Made four goals against Padley.

Marvellous.

I lost a secretary. Oh?

Oh everything is gummed up.

I'm sorry I won't do.

What a funny secretary you'd be.

I engaged a man. Well, well.

He was there when I fired Harper.

He worked with me tonight. Is my honor still intact?

It hasn't even been menaced.

He's just a boy, but so ambitious.

I like ambitious people.

Voom. Right on the chin.

Come here.

Why don't you like work?

Would you like a serious answer?

Perhaps not tonight.

I'm so glad because I haven't one.

Sleep well, adorable.

Goodnight, darling.

And I won't tell them any more funny stories.

Oh no, no.

Silly. Goodnight.

If you will come to this office in the afternoon ..

This matter can possibly be adjusted.

If the consideration is shown that we have the right to expect in this matter.

Any unpleasantness will undoubtedly be avoided.

Yours very truly.

Oh, I beg your pardon.

Oh ..

I think that does it. What's next?

The Harding matter. Oh yes. The Harding matter.

It's in those files over there. Would you mind getting it for me, please?

Certainly.

I'm so sorry. Oh, it's quite alright.

Thank you.

It .. it slipped off.

Yes. They sometimes do.

Aren't they well done?

Thoroughly, Mrs Ames. Good. We'll accept them, then.

Take this letter to Mr George Ponsby.

The drawings for the Fielding novel have been received.

I want to compliment you on your splendid work.

However, in regard to the price.

Hello?

Who?

Tommy who?

Oh.

This must be for you.

Thank you, Mrs Ames.

Hello.

Oh .. how do you do?

Well, that's a funny greeting.

I heard you got a new job last night.

I'm sorry. I can't talk to you now. I'm busy.

I'll call you back later.

Tommy, have you got tonsillitis?

Yes .. yes.

Yes.

Yes.

Are there many more?

Goodbye.

Where were we, please?

"This being, as you know, one of our cut-rate publications."

I hope you will take that fact in to consideration.

With kindest regards, yours sincerely ..

By the way, Mr Sherman.

It will be more convenient if you have your friends call outside office hours.

And not on my own phone.

I'm terribly sorry, Mrs Ames. It won't happen again. I can tell you that.

Well, you needn't get upset by it. Now take those letters to be typed.

Yes, Mrs Ames.

Then I want you to read this manuscript.

Let me know what you think of it. Yes, Mrs Ames.

Is your office comfortable? Quite, thank you.

Anything you need, just let me know. Thank you, Mrs Ames.

That's all for the present. Thanks.

Oh, Mr Sherman. Yes?

Please.

You've only been with a few hours. How do you like it so far?

I'm delighted, Mrs Ames.

I only hope my work is satisfactory. Quite.

You seemed more at ease last night. I wasn't employed here then.

See, I've never worked for a woman before.

And I've never had a male secretary either.

But that is no reason why we shouldn't be at ease in our work.

You see, I .. I'm not going to keep you just taking letters.

I'm need someone who can take on part of the burden of the work.

I should like that, Mrs Ames. Perhaps that sounded premature.

I don't want you to feel you're just a male stenographer.

I'll show what I can do if you give me a chance. - Shake.

I can't thank you enough, Mrs Ames. Oh, I'm sorry.

Oh, I ..

Oh .. I am sorry.

No harm done.


Did you get the layouts from McGowan?

Huh? Huh?

Did you and McGowan fix the layouts? Oh yes.

Yes, and I've got that Peterson matter just where we want it.

He'll come to us. Really? That's great.

You've saved us a lawsuit or money.

I know I'd have given in to him. Oh no you wouldn't.

I know you.

But fighting a man like Peterson is no job for a woman.

I suppose not.

It was quite novel having someone fight for me.

All in a day's work.

A good day's work, Tommy.

Hello, Ann.

Hello, Freddie.

Who is the nice-looking man with Lois?

Oh that's Sherman. He's in the firm.

No wonder she enjoys her work.

Well, that about covers everything.

It was nice of you to come down, Tommy.

I hope you will stay down here until you're rested up.

Hmm. I'm not needed at the office anymore?

Not just at present. But you're terribly missed.

Well, I must be going.

Stay and have a swim.

I couldn't be tempted. Meet the crowd. You never have.

I belong to the office.

Well, perhaps you're right.

You know Tommy, I'm glad you don't know a bunch like that.

I did know them, plenty of them.

But that was before I knew the office.

I'll send you back in my car.

Thanks. I have one.

I think I'll be in tomorrow. This isn't really a rest.

I see.

So long. So long, Tommy.

Why were you so long? Was I?

Only two hours.

Sorry. Didn't realize.

Hello, Lois. Hello.

I was just admiring your secretary. Were you?

I should think he'd be more useful as a social secretary.

Really?

Confound it! I'll be right back. I forgot to tell him something.

Okay. We'll be waiting for you.

Well, I've seen your boss.

Have you? I looked through the hedge.

When I asked what she looked like, you certainly gave me a fine description.

That was when I first met her. She's been reducing.

You didn't want me to know.

Now, please, please. Oh, I hate her!

I hate her! I hate that place.

Tommy, you do love me don't you?

Of course I do. Then kiss me.


Phew. Maybe we get a break.

Hello.

Hi. Hello, Ruthie.

Hey, it's Ruthie.

I'm out.

He's not in yet.

Yeah, maybe when he comes back we'll all go bye-byes.

Yes. Goodbye.

What made you say that?

Well, aren't we going out anymore?

I'm going for a walk in the park and go to bed.

Oh, another one of those nice quiet Saturday nights.

For me. I'm tired.

Yeah, and a peaceful Sunday. And a dreamy one.

What's the matter with you?

Oh, I'm alright as the coach used to say to the reporters ..

After the opposition has scored their first touch-down.


That's a fine pass Fred gave Arthur that time.

He made the goal possible.

Fred's playing beautifully, isn't he.

That's a splendid animal he's riding this chukka.

Is that Glen Castle?

I say.

I can't make it out.

Looks a little bit too long in the back for Glen Castle.

Do you know, my dear?

I'm sorry.

I'm not very well acquainted with my husband's horses.

Bang!

There! That's Fred's favorite shot.

Really?

That's one of your husband's finest points, Lois.

Always sticks to his man.

Never out of position.

Right where he ought to be all the time.

Yes. I've noticed that, too.

Well.

A fast chukka, that.

Makes me want to get back into action again.

I haven't played since I left India, you know.

It is positively the most thrilling game in the world to watch.

Don't you love it, Lois? I was just thinking.

An action picture of the game would make a marvellous cover for the magazine.

Don't you ever forget the magazine?

Well, hardly ever.

Hardly ever ..

Hello, darling. Hello, Lois.

Jolly well played, old boy. Thanks, Orca.

Well Lois, you getting to enjoy it better?

Mr Orca has explained some of the finer points. - Good.

Oh, you remember Hector McEwen, Lois?

Yes, of course. How are you. How do you do?

You're playing splendidly.

Freddie, you were marvellous.

Arthur wouldn't have made that goal if not for you.

You think I play better than I did earlier in the season?

Much.

Really? Hmm.

Well, shall I type what I have?

[ Telephone ]

Hello?

Who is calling?

Who?

A "Miss Ruth", sir.

Conference.

Oh. Mr Sherman is in conference. Could I take the message?

No, I'm sorry.

No, there, is no way that I can ..

Alright. I'll take it.

Hello.

Oh, she thought you were Babe Ruth.

Yes, he's writing some stories for us.

I didn't think you'd refuse to talk to me.

Especially now that you can.

Why didn't you tell me your boss was on a vacation?

Why, she's been gone two weeks and you never told me.

If I hadn't called Andy I wouldn't have known a thing about it.

I could have been ringing you up every day.

Yes.

My child, I'm busier now than ever.

Mrs Ames is calling from Bar Harbor. She's on the other phone.

Hello, Lois. How are you?

Tommy, I'm just haywire.

Hello!

Hello!

Tommy, why don't you talk to me?

Anyone who goes on vacation and tries to do business by correspondence is crazy.

Operator.

Who cut me off?

I was having the loveliest talk.

I don't know what happened. What happened?

I'll have to come straight home unless you catch the next train.

Can you?

Splendid!

Whee ..

I want Corona 8 double 0 2 0.

0.


How is this one?

You said just the right thing.

But your typing is atrocious.

Won't it do?

What do you think?

I think we should have the hotel stenographer.

Oh, she's in bed by now.

We should have had her all day.

We can't talk with a girl sitting round. Oh yes we could.

But you were such a little kid.

I hadn't the heart. Thanks.

Well, I'll address it.

Now you had better type up the Hadbury manuscript.

Though I'm a little doubtful about running it.

Why?

Sickly with sentiment.

Well, that's why I picked it.

I think we should run more sentimental stuff.

Young love .. romance.

People are beginning to come back to it.

Perhaps.

You're not putting up a strong argument.

Oh, it's too nice an evening.

It's too lovely a night Tommy, to run down romance.

I wish we were down there walking under the trees.

Dancing over the grass.

I wonder if the realization would be as beautiful as the thought.

I suppose you're right about the Hadbury manuscript.

But I'll have to turn it down.

I thought it had feeling. It has.

But it shouldn't be spoiled by so much talk.

No, you're right.


Dance? Again?

I'm still steady.

Freddie.

I didn't trail you all the way to Bar Harbor just to dance with you.

Oh, yes of course. We are in Bar Harbor aren't we. Thank you for reminding me.

We are, and the place has possibilities.

Let's look them up. Alright.

They're still working.

Is she up there alone with him? Just imagine.

Don't you really care?

I prefer not be a shabby sport.


Tommy. Oh Lois, I ..

It's alright, dear.

It can be forgotten, because it has no meaning.

What's this?

I don't think you've been severe enough, Tommy.

That man will never pay his instalments in time unless we bully him.

Let's write another.

Alright.

Gentlemen.

In regard to the Hadbury manuscript.

Darling. Please.

They'll work until daylight.

We'd better be sure. Alright.

I'll be right back. Right.

May I come in?

You didn't have to knock. Thanks.

So early, darling.

I just drifted in to see if I were required.

Well, you're still busy so ..

I'll go back. No, don't.

Haven't you played enough for one night?

Why do you have to go down there again? I don't want you to.

I'm tired. When you come in late ..

Okay.

Good boy.

Goodnight, Tommy. We'll finish in the morning.

Oh, Mr Sherman, Mr Sherman.

Goodnight, Mr Sherman. Goodnight.

Like a little nightcap? No thank you.

Alright.


Room 384.

Darling.

No.

Cross?

That I wouldn't let you stay out?

Have I ..

Ever been cross?

Very.

You're too indolent. Not always.


Well.

As you like.


Why my dear, there is no reason why we shouldn't.

I think you're a marvellous dancer.

And how. Ha.

Hey, I'll be over to get you about 8:30.

Yeah. I was in the hot shower when you called.

Now I'll take a cold shower.

Hey, Ruthie .. do you think your folks mind if I take you out?

You know, I haven't met them yet.

Well, tonight you can.

You know they think Tommy is a nice boy, but Dads just crazy about football.

Yeah?

Yeah.

Hey, I thought you weren't due back until Wednesday.

You thought wrong.

Hey, what?

Who are you talking to?

Oh, put him on the phone will you.

Yes, of course our date is still on, but let me talk to Tommy.

Hey, it's Ruthie. No.

No, no. He just walked down the hall.

No, I can't do that. All I've got on is a towel.

Here, give it to me.

Hello, darling.

I'll be round in about an hour.

Maybe we'll go dancing somewhere.

Okay, I'm glad you're glad.

Goodbye, darling.

She told me to tell you she forgot she had a date with me. - Huh?

You shouldn't try to chisel, Andy. You're not the type.

Oh, what's the use of trying to help you out, anyway.

A waste of passion.

Yeah, I know. You're going to go out and get plastered tonight.

I can tell by the look in your eyes.

And you'll be a fine sight for the office in the morning.

I'm through with the office.

What?

I'm quitting. What for?

Scala 8349.

What?

This is Tom Sherman.

I want you to send up a couple of orchids to Miss Ruth Holman.

For a corsage.

Yeah, that's 35 East 59th Street.

Right away. Thanks.

Hey, what is all this? What are you quitting for?

I'm going to get married.

To your boss?

Are you crazy?

Hey, not that sap, Ruthie?

What do you mean? Well, she doesn't know it.

Well, she's going to know it tonight.

Hey, shut off that shower will you. You're driving me nutty.

I'll shut it off when I get good and ready!

Sure, I know. You're stuck on your boss.

That's why you're quitting your job.

And that's why you're going to marry this other dame.

Where are my collars? You hear what I'm saying?

Oh, shut up! Let's talk this over.

There is nothing to talk over. She's got a husband.

Sure. The other team has got the ball.

First down and three yards to go for a touch-down.

What do you do? Say the season is over and join the track team?

Well, football is different to fighting because you can't throw in a towel.

I wonder who he thinks I am, waiting like this.

I wish now I'd gone with Andy.

I'll give you one more chance.

[ Andy and Peter: drunk singing ]

[ Drunk singing ]

[ Drunk singing ]

[ Drunk singing ]

Did you have a nice trip, Mrs Ames? Yes, thank you. But glad to be back.

Tell Mr Sherman I'm here. Yes, Mrs Ames.

Hello, Lois. Hello, Tommy.

How are things?

Oh, you didn't get the letter I left on your desk? - No.

What is it?

It's my resignation.

Why? Aren't you happy here?

Oh, I've never been happier. You'll believe that, I know.

Well I don't want you to go .. if you've some silly idea in your head that ..

Oh, let's tear it up and forget it.

There is something else. Yes?

I'm engaged to be married.

Congratulations.

Oh, thanks.

Need that interfere with you staying here?

I'm afraid it does.

You see her father is George Holman, the commission merchant. - Yes?

When he heard we're engaged, he wanted me to take a place in the firm.

Oh I see. Well, that's fine isn't it?

I'm not particularly crazy about it. Oh, you'll like it.

Of course you will. Under the circumstances.

When did it happen? Last week.

Hmm. While I was away? Yes.

Well, that's taught me a lesson. I'm going on my last vacation.

Oh, I'll know you'll be happy.

I'll stay as long as you need me.

Thanks. This is the 6th.

Shall we say the .. 15th?

That's a week from Saturday? Right.

Hello?

"Mr Weinberg is here." Okay.

Weinberg is here. Will you see him?

Fight or compromise? Fight. - Right.

[ Buzzer ]

Oh, shut up.


Don't you love it?

I can stand it if you can.

Why, Tommy.

You'll have us dancing to the Blue Danube next.

Someday we'll go there.


Darling, where are we going?

I don't know. Let's not go dancing tonight.

Then, let's drive along the ocean. Oh, nix on the ocean.

Not even with me?

Oh, Tommy!

She's working tonight.

Aren't you glad you aren't up there?

Oh, let's go to Coney Island.

Of all the free places ..

I don't see why you had to pick the highest one in the place.

They go down faster.

Oh dear.

Oh my goodness .. I don't like it.


Come in.

Well.

I hope I didn't disturb you. Darling.

I was awake when you drove up.

Come in, darling.

Anything special?

A little drink?

Oh, you're shivering.

Here.

Jump under the blankets.

I'm just a little jumpy.

The drink will help.

Comfy?

Fine.

A hard day? Sort of.

I lost my secretary again. No?

That chap .. He's getting married.

Hard luck, eh?

Hard to replace. Hmm.

Well, in such things I'm rather an inadequate.

You are you, Freddie. Hmm.

And that is all there is to be said.

You are sweet.

Darling.

It's nice having a nightcap together.

Yes. It is.

Let's do it often. Hmm.

You are not in my class as a ..

Night-bird.

I'd like to be.

Why?

Ditching the office?

Not completely.

The office isn't everything.

I'm going on a long vacation.

Well ..

Here is .. to it then ..

How is Paula?

Flourishing.

Oh, by the way.

The English match is on. Really.

Yes, I'll be going over next week.

Oh.

Oh.

Well.

Don't you feel like asking me to go with you?

Do you really want to go, Lois?

Perhaps it's too late to ask me?

I was going to write you a letter.

When I got to England.

I'm better at that.

I see.

Yes, it ..

It is easier to write.

Divorce.

Oh, it's been all my fault.

Oh now don't say that.

Someone else?

But nothing will ever change my feeling for you.

I understand. Thanks.

We can't change ourselves, can we?

And trying won't make us any happier. You're right.

You were trying tonight, weren't you. Uhuh.

Sort-of an attempt to do the right thing by your Freddie.

That and ..

I was a little lonely, too. Oh, you'll get over that.

I know.

Don't you really think it's better?

It will be in the end.

I'd better get back where I belong.

What's that, dear? Nothing, now.

May I see? No. Forget it.

Please.


Oh, Freddie.

I feel like crying too, but ..

It doesn't mean anything.

It's just a moment.

It won't last.

Lois. No. You know it won't.

Don't spoil it by trying.

Good luck, then.

Same to you.

A penny for your thoughts.

Tomorrow is the last day at the office.

Thank heavens.

Now is the first night we've done things that make me feel really engaged to you.

You mean, sitting on sand? Uhuh.

I think father is going to give us a wedding trip to Europe.

That will be nice.

Let's pretend we're there now, shall we?

Out there is the Mediterranean.

Okay.

How does it feel to be looking out at it with the girl you love?

How does it feel, darling?

Well, it feels like ..

Looking at the Mediterranean.

Is that the best you can do?

With the Atlantic Ocean, yes.

You act as if we've been married ten years.

I wonder what we'll be doing ten years from now.

Oh who gives a darn? Ten years from now ..

Get your flask out and be human.

Take it all. You need it.

I can't. I can't think anymore.

I can't concentrate.

Shall I type what I have?

That's right.

I'll find the address in the file, or Mr Sherman will have it.

Don't ask Mister Sherman.

Maybe he's busy.

Hello?

Oh, hello Ruth.

No, I can't dine with your family tonight.

Let's dine at the casino with Andy.

I'm leaving the office now.

See you later.


I came to say goodbye.

Oh. Yes, you're leaving tonight, aren't you.

Would you do me one more favor before you go?

A favor for you?

With pleasure.

Tell her what you've lined up on the Myers contract.

Is that all?

Well, I'm trying to get along without you, but ..

I see.

How is the new secretary? Just a secretary.

Oh Tommy, she'll never take your place.

Now the situation is this, as I understand it.

I'm tired of waiting. I'm going to eat.

Yeah, I'm hungry too.

I think it is outrageous. He's an hour late already.

Well, it's his last day. I'm certainly glad of that.

Well I suppose now he's leaving, he's showing the boss how the office works.

She ought to know how the office works by now.

I hate to eat without Tommy. What do you say I call him up and tell him hurry up?

If you don't, I will. No, no, no! I'll do it.

[ Door knocks ]

Come in.

Good evening. Set it on the table.

[ Telephone ]

Hello?

Why this is he speaking.

Tom, this is Andy.

Hey listen, Ruth is all red-headed on account of you're late.

And I'm afraid that ..

I'm sorry. I'm in conference.

Tommy, I feel really guilty about keeping you this late.

That's alright.

Just my playful room-mate. He's been drinking.

Well.

Goodbye.

Please.

It's my last dictation.

Yes, Mrs Ames.

Oh, it's a cruel world.

Dining with the wrong woman tonight.

I wish you wouldn't keep hammering on that.

Are you cross?

It's hot.

But it's good.

Did you get him?

Well .. he hung up.

What?

Well!

I'll show him.

I'll go right down there to the office and demand a showdown.

This all looks mighty funny to me.

Waiter, check please.

Do you remember that first night you drove me home?

You kept saying the wrong things that night.

Perhaps I had better take a cab tonight.

Hmm.

Perhaps a cab is a good idea.

[ Door knocks ]

Yes?

Later.

Tom Sherman, you ought to be ashamed of yourself.

Gee Tom, I did my best to muzzle her, but I couldn't.

So this is the way you work!

I always suspected it. Well, you've humiliated me for the last time.

Do you mind telling me who you are?

You bet I'll tell you. Plenty.

I happen to be the girl that he's engaged to.

Ruth, do you think you'd better go home? I'll go when I'm good and ready.

I kept telling her not to do this.

But she always looked the other way.

I apologise.

I should have phoned you but, we were so busy that ..

I can imagine how busy you were, lounging around here with this ..

I'm afraid it's all my fault. You bet it's your fault.

You're in with love him. Ruth.

You're in love with him!

That's why you keep him locked up here with you night after night.

I tried to keep her away, believe it or not.

It's a fine thing for a woman to do. Ruth.

If she thinks she'll get away with this, she's got another think coming.

What are you going to do? Shoot me?

I wish I could. But I'll get even with you just the same. See if I don't.

Really? How?

You won't be so infernally calm after I go to your husband and say all I know.

Tell him how you're carrying on with a man I'm practically married to.

So you are going to tell my husband? Try and stop me!

Well, you may have trouble catching him. He's on his way to Paris for a divorce.

Well ..?

Well ..?

Anyhow, I'll .. I'll ..

I'll .. I would, too.

Get her out of here. Shoot her. Break her leg. Anything.

Why me? I didn't bring her in here.

I hate you! I loathe you!

Everybody always said I'd be throwing my life away if I married you.

Here.

Here .. give this to your .. your boss!

Do you know my dear, if I weren't a lady I'd tell you what I really think of you.

Gee Lois, I'm sorry.

You couldn't help it, Tommy.

Well I guess I'll be trotting along now.

These scenes are always a big strain on me.

I'm awfully glad to have met you and I hope we didn't intrude.

Oh, no. Not at all. Thanks.

You're Tommy's best friend, aren't you? Sure.

I'll humiliate him. I'll make him feel as cheap as he made me feel.

I'll get revenge. How?

Oh, it's a marvellous idea.

I'll marry you. Huh?

No, no, no. No, I couldn't do that.

You see, I promised my poor old mother.

That I wouldn't get married until I was 65.

Oh, I could make you happy.

Oh, I don't doubt that. You see ..

My family is against marriage.

What?

Oh sure. It's an old custom of ours.

There hasn't been a marriage in my family for three generations.

Come on. Huh?

Are you laughing at me? Hmm. - Why?

Why didn't you tell me your fiancée was like that?

Why didn't you tell me you weren't going to stay married?

Still going into business?

No. Think l'll freelance.

Looks like I'm going to freelance, too.

Let's freelance together. Just a moment.

Will you take a letter, please?

0f course.

My dear Mister Sherman.

In regard to our recent conversation.

I regret that I did not inform you of my impending divorce.

However ..

I promise it will never happen again.

Yours forever.

Lois.

(Ro_s)