Stalingrad (2013) Script

[♪♪♪]

ANNOUNCER 1 [IN JAPANESE]: Today, March 11th...

ANNOUNCER 2: I received the tragic news of an unprecedented earthquake of magnitude 9, and the destruction caused by the tsunami.

The number of victims is growing steadily and the extent of the damage caused by this disaster is impossible to assess at this moment.

Foreign volunteers are joining our massive rescue efforts.

We will overcome this setback...

ANNOUNCER 1: --rebuild the ravaged areas, and Japan itself.

Join me in praying for our success.

[♪♪♪]

[MAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY OVER PA]

[THUNDER RUMBLING]

[SIREN WAILING IN DISTANCE]

[INDISTINCT RADIO CHATTER]


MAN: Total number of casualties? Roughly?

Nearly 8,000 in our area.

It's a rotten situation. Could blow at any time.

I can't use any machines.

It's all hanging by a thread.

Twenty-eight people were taken out alive.

They say there are five more in the dining hall.

Two girls, three guys. All Germans.

They're in there.

It rained and the mud sealed it tight.

We cleaned it up and put in a tube with a camera.

We'll try from the other side too.

That's all we can do right now.

None of them are hurt badly. But they're lying only 30 centimeters below the slab.

Very dangerous. It could go again at any moment.

DOCTOR [IN GERMAN OVER RADIO]: Keep calm, kids.

This is the doctor speaking.

Don't all talk at once.

There isn't much oxygen. Just one of you.

Answer after I've asked a question.

Briefly describe things for me.

Who is this?

NINA [IN GERMAN]: This is Nina.

Can you hear me?

There are five of us.

We're all-- We're all still alive.

Very good, kids. Here's how we're going to do this:

Stay still and try to conserve oxygen.

After we get you out, we can talk in more detail.

No. Please don't go.

Just talk to us a little, okay? Please.

I can't go. The subway is closed. Does anyone know you're here?

Your mother? Father?

Yes. My mother knows.

My father is dead.

[SOBBING] I miss him so much.

Hey, Nina. Nina, don't cry.

You'll use up all the oxygen.

I had five fathers, and I miss them all.

They're all dead. But I'm not crying.

Five fathers?

That's not possible.

Possible, impossible.

How would you know?

It is possible.

[♪♪♪]

Stalingrad

[EXPLOSIONS IN DISTANCE]


My God.

Walking on water?

SON: Yeah. We're all apostles now.

Shush, you little shit.

Barely out of diapers and you make jokes.

I'll give you a whipping.

That's enough, Pop.

The sappers swamped the crossing so you can't see it from above.

FATHER: God help them then.

Let's go, brothers.

[♪♪♪]

NARRATOR: It was in Stalingrad.

Autumn, 1942.

The Russians were crossing the Volga to gain a foothold on the other bank and keep the Germans from taking the city and the river access.

This was all but impossible.

But they didn't think about that.

Each one fought his best, not knowing that he was fighting in the bloodiest battle in human history.

[MAN SHOUTING INDISTINCTLY]

[CHATTERING]

Not good.

Scouts.

MAN: Jump.

Pouch, helmet.

Okay, jump-


[WHISPERING] Sit down.

Did you mark the ways through?

Any mines?

Have you tried talking?

[MAN GIBBERING IN SLURRED VOICE]

Chvanov.

[IN NORMAL VOICE] At our factory we had a deaf mute, a retard.

There are no retards in the USSR.

There are mentally ill, but no retards.

Okay. Wait for the assault group, lead them to the oil tanks, then catch up.

Let's go.


We're here. The building is here.

We sneak in. Then it's a coin flip, heads or tails.

Heads, we look for the detonator.

Should be on the second floor.

No reason for them to put it any higher where it could get hit. Tails, we find the detonator right away and kill them all.

We cut every wire we find.

That's it.

[EXPLOSIONS IN DISTANCE]

[MEN CHATTERING IN GERMAN]


KAHN [IN GERMAN]: Jurgens. Jurgens.

The Russians are coming. [IN GERMAN] What?

Radio the news.

There's no signal, captain.

All right, Jurgens.

I'd rather not ask why there's no signal.

Blow up the tanks.

But that's the fuel for the whole army, captain.

JUrgens.

You're an idiot. The Russians are here.

[IN GERMAN] I'll be back in a second.


[MAN 1 SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY IN GERMAN]

[IN GERMAN] The Russians have trenches there.

Both flanks are mined. We couldn't advance due to heavy fire.

MAN 2 [IN GERMAN]: Grenades!

[♪♪♪]

[SCREAMS]

[GUNFIRE]

[WHISPERS] Found you, you son of a bitch.

[GRUNTING]

[SHOUTS IN GERMAN]

[MAN 3 SPEAKS IN GERMAN]


Well, God save us. Let's go, son.

[SCREAMING]


[GRUNTING]

[GUNSHOT]

[GUNSHOT]


[♪♪♪]

[SCREAMING]


My boy.

[EXPLOSION]


[SCREAMING]


GROMOV: Stand guard.

I'll go upstairs.

[MUFFLED SCREAMING IN DISTANCE]

[MUFFLED SCREAMING]


Comrade. I'm one of you. I'm a spotter.

Find my radio. I need it.

Comrade.

There it is.

We made it here yesterday from the fire station.

The Germans killed my radioman.

Are you scouts?

Yeah. But what the hell are you?

I told you, I'm a spotter. An officer.

Officer? I direct artillery.

Why'd the krauts hang you like a Christmas ornament?

I haven't slept for three days.

I was weak. I froze.

You fucked up the crossing, asshole.

They burned alive. There was no cover fire.

And you haven't slept? Commander.

What is it? Semyonov's dead.

Our radio's broken.

His works. Should we keep him?

You really know how to use the radio?

Yes.

Contact headquarters.

I Will.

Give me the frequency and your call sign.

It's Kaluga, 44 and three.

Sissy.

Don't call me "Sissy."

I'm an officer of the worker-peasant army.

Give me a gun, please.

Contact HQ.

If you don't, I'll shoot you.

CHVANOV: Captain! Come quick.

Who's he got?

Is it a boy?

Are you okay, kid? Shh.

It's a girl. Heh.

Definitely a girl, commander.

She's shell-shocked, out of her mind.

We'll sort it out later.

And Nikiforov?

CHVANOV: There he is.

He brought a grubby guest.

Who the devil are you?

I'm no devil, comrade captain. I'm an angel.

Polyakov. Gun commander.

GROMOV: Gun commander? POLYAKOV: Yes, sir.

And where's this gun you command?

Over there, in the archway.

Got any shells? POLYAKOV: Yes.

One round.

I see.

Well, then, let's do some fighting.

[♪♪♪]

ASTAKHOV: Comrade captain!

It's division HQ.

Sit down.

So we have to babysit her now?

That's all we need, damn it.

Commander, look what the krauts did to her.

It's a war, Angel. She's alive.

NARRATOR: That's how they met.

Five men, charred by two years of fighting, blown by the wind from the big towns and backwaters of our huge country to a city spread along the banks of a great river.

Five men and my mother.

My young mother.

[♪♪♪]

[AIR RAID SIREN WAILING]

[AIRCRAFT GUNFIRE]

[AIRCRAFT ENGINES DRONING]

[GASPS]

[♪♪♪]

[AIRCRAFT ENGINES DRONING]

NARRATOR: The building where Mama lived blocked one of the exits to the Volga.

For months, our troops would capture the building and then leave again.

Mama was tired of living in an inferno, tired of being shocked by human grief, human cruelty and even by her own patience.

Mama just kept living in her old home and didn't want to leave it.

This was her room, her apartment, her stairs, her street, and finally, her city.

She simply couldn't abandon it.

It was a few days before her 19th birthday.

CHVANOV: What have we here?

A fountain.

Three hundred meters.

Nobody runs from Chvanov.

Nothing hides from Chvanov.

There's a broken tank in the shop window.

Goddamned krauts.

Their machines are garbage. Nothing works.

Nothing shoots.

Mm...

They made a nest, the filthy birds. GROMOV: Chvanov.

CHVANOV: Mm?

Go down and see how the guys are doing.

Okay. Sissy, how did you do this?

NARRATOR: In Apartment 8, former home of Sazonov, Mama's neighbor, collector of butterflies and insects, Gromov had set up his lookout point.

MAN [OVER RADIO]: Hold the building for three days until the division forces cross to your side.

Understood? GROMOV: Sort of, Number 4.

What don't you understand, Number 2?

I don't understand how to follow your order, Number 4.

You're regular army, but you sound like a draftee.

You figure it out. Understood?

Yes, sir, Number 4.

That's all.

[♪♪♪]

[TURNS OFF RADIO]

Stop.

What are you doing here?

Stop, stop.

Stop it. I won't hurt you.

You can't be here, they'll kill you.

Get out.

This is my home, not yours.

Yours? Sure you don't mind us barging in?

No. You can stay for now.

Give me your canteen.

[♪♪♪]

NARRATOR: That night, their ranks grew.

Every survivor nearby came by instinct.

On the first floor there were sailors, mobilized factory workers and a few sappers.

They set up in Apartment 6 where the large Kulikov family had lived.

Now there was a machine gun there.

[GUNSHOT]

The fascist bitch works. Ha-ha-ha.

Come here. Shoot some Germans with it.

I was joking.

Give me your canteens.

Will I get it back?

Here, here.

She's simple-minded.

You could do whatever you want to her.

She's so small and sweet.

Can't you take a joke?

Don't just stand there.

What's the girl's name?

What's your name?

Katya.

[♪♪♪]

Give me your canteen.

So, comrade residents, the first floor is yours.

Set it up and fortify it.

Stay inside. Only shoot on command.

And get rid of the krauts. They'll start to stink.

Pick them up and toss them out.

GROMOV: Who's in charge? I am.

Warrant Officer Krasnov.

And here? Me. I'm the superintendent.

Hi. Hello.

COLONEL [IN GERMAN]: A soldier.

And another one.

There's an officer.

It's probably poor Jurgens.

What's wrong, Kahn?

Why haven't you made a report? Your men get thrown out windows, yet you're just fine.

Would you prefer me dead, colonel?

I want to know why that damn building is full of Russians.

My orders weren't to hold the site. I was to blow up the fuel tanks to keep them from the enemy.

Kahn, do you know what distinguishes a German officer from other armies' officers?

Well?

He doesn't question orders, he follows them.

That's precisely why the Wehrmacht is at the Volga and why it will soon reach India. Don't worry.

I doubt you'll have to learn how to ride an elephant.

Unh! These goddamn lice.

Our men are scratching like monkeys.

The Russians put ash in their soap.

Ash?

In the soap?

Barbarians.

Kahn, tomorrow, that whole damn building will be ours.

You lost it to the Russians and you're going to get it back.

Put ash in the soap to kill the damn lice.

[IN GERMAN] Yes, sir, colonel.

So they're throwing our men out windows.

Then we'll have to teach them a lesson.

CHVANOV: Next.

An officer.

[SCOFFS]

Ooh.

Even a mangy sheep has some wool.

ASTAKHOV: Freeze! Freeze! WOMAN: Aah!

WOMAN: Don't shoot!

We're on your side!

Hands up! Put down the gun!

Hands UP!

WOMAN: My hands are full. Who are you?

Locals.

You live here?

WOMAN: No, near the port.

GROMOV: Why are you here?

Check the baskets.

Give me that.

Dirt.

Definitely dirt. And sand.

Dirt.

We were at the river.

We always come this way.

Why? We take dirt from the bank.

The Germans bombed a grain barge.

We sift out the grain to make porridge for the children.

It's like chewing sand, but you can still eat it.

Can we go?

The Germans. And?

And what?

It's the front, stupid. Your damned front will move.

Then what, do we follow you?

We didn't let them take the city. We live here.

We walk here every day.

Let her go.

I can't stand her voice.

I'll shoot you. Shut up!

You shut up.

That's enough.

[CHILD SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY]

[♪♪♪]

[CHATTERING]

[EXPLOSIONS AND GUNFIRE IN DISTANCE]

[CHILD & WOMAN SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY]

[SPEAKS IN GERMAN]

Lice?

[IN RUSSIAN] Soap? Yes, it's soap.

[CHATTERING]

MAN: Don't look away, you piece of trash.

Oh, God, he's back.

Haven't seen you for a week. I was hoping you were dead.

[IN GERMAN] Other people are eating the food I bring you.

Are you giving it to them?

Or are they taking it from you, hm?

[♪♪♪]


Look.

My wife.

The first time I saw you, I could hardly believe the resemblance.

Don't you agree?

My Christina is dead.

Tuberculosis.

Who is that?

My wife.

Wife.

[SPEAKS IN RUSSIAN]

[SPEAKS IN GERMAN THEN SPEAKS IN RUSSIAN]

[EXPLOSIONS]

I have to go.

The food is for you.

Do you understand? It's only for you.

I'll be back.

KAHN: Listen up. If anyone takes food from this woman, I will personally shoot him.

GROMOV: A gun, grenades.

One. Four more.

So...

listen.

Here's the city.

Here's the crossing.

This is our building.

If they take it, they'll burn the crossing again. This is an ideal spot so we can't let them in here.

Got it?

We don't have many rounds.

We have a German machine gun with four belts.

Three. GROMOV: Three.

Enough to fight for an hour.

There's the artillery.

The artillery's ready.

Okay, comrades. You know your positions.

Man your posts. They'll be here soon.

Wait a minute, captain.

We can go to our posts, but what are we doing here?

Defending this building.

Those are our orders.

From who?

Division headquarters.

That's a different outfit. You got the orders, so you follow them.

I'm going to go find my own division. You stay here.

We're going back across.

Nikiforov, shoot the sailor.

SAILOR: What?

Why'd you do that?

We could've used him.

What for?

I don't have a ship.

Commander. On the square.

[MAN 1 & MAN 2 SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY IN GERMAN]

[♪♪♪]

What's this circus?

[IN GERMAN] Colonel, we've rounded up the people.


Ask her if she's a Jew.

[IN RUSSIAN] Are you a Jew?

A Jew? Not in my family.

We never even lived near any.

[GASPS THEN SHOUTING INDISTINCTLY]

[GIRL SCREAMING]

WOMAN 1: Let go! WOMAN 2: Auntie Rimma!

Let them go! Come on, come on.

Me and my little girl!

We're not Jews!

CHVANOV: They're in the bus.

They're going to burn it, captain.

WOMAN 1: Let the little girl go!

She's not a Jew, she's a child!

[WOMAN 1 SHOUTING INDISTINCTLY]

GRAMOV: See the officer? CHVANOV: Yeah.

GRAMOV: Can you get him?

How? The bastards are hiding behind kids.

[WOMAN 1 CONTINUES SHOUTING]

What in God's name is going on?

Why weren't we ordered to attack?

Kahn, I'll answer your question, though I'm not required to.

I know the rules, colonel.

I have no doubt.

But in war, we'd all do well to remember our roots, our customs.

Our ancestors offered sacrifices before battle.

Go back to your men. The order to attack will come.

Or do you want to watch the sacrifice?

No.

It's okay. It'll be okay.

Don't be afraid. Someone will help us.

[GIRL CRYING]

[♪♪♪]

[WOMAN 1 CONTINUES SHOUTING]

There you are. KATYA: Don't just sit there!

Do something!

It's a woman with a child!

Shoot them! They'll burn them alive!

It'll hurt!

Commander, calm her down.

She's right, Chvanov. Shoot Shoot at children?

[GIRL SCREAMING]

[WOMAN 1 & GIRL SCREAMING]

Damn it!

Give me that.

[SOBBING]

[GUNSHOT]

God have mercy.

Burn in hell, scum!

[SCREAMS]

Attack!

Kill the bastards!

[SCREAMING]

Kill them with whatever you've got!

[SHOUTING]

[YELLING]

[YELLING]


[SHOUTING]


[YELLS]

[SCREAMS]


MAN [IN GERMAN]: Mortars in position!

Fall back!

[♪♪♪]

[MORTAR WHISTLING]

Mortars!


[CHATTERING]

[SPEAKS IN GERMAN THEN GRUNTS]

[COUGHING]

[WOMAN WHISPERING INDISTINCTLY]


[GRUNTS]

[♪♪♪]


Should've drowned them.

They keep crawling out like rats.

Hey, blondie. Report to the commander.

KATYA: It'll sting for a minute.

[♪♪♪]

Does it hurt?

It's okay. It'll heal.

Sasha.

Alexander Nikiforov.

Yes, I know your name.

Before the war, Mama and I used to go to your concerts.

I know all your songs and arias.

Mama loved you.

My sister too.

Your portraits hung on our wall.

CHVANOV: Nikiforov.

The commander wants you.

Sasha.

Will you sing for me sometime?

Sing? Him? He only talks twice a year.

Is there something I don't know?

Come here.

[CHVANOV LAUGHS]

Alexander Nikiforov. Tenor.

[LAUGHS]

NIKIFOROV: Did you call me, captain? Come here.

See the plane?

See it?

It's a Heinkel.

He was going to bomb the crossing. Bastard.

There are two machine guns and a smaller gun in the radioman's cabin.

Nikiforov. Sappers, help him.

Take the rifle and some tools.

Wrap them up so they don't rattle.

I'm a sapper, not a repairman.

Go on! Go!

[WHISPERS] What's the matter?

We killed 14 Germans.

They got six of us.

We got off easy.

Got a smoke?

I'm off. Go ahead.

[♪♪♪]

[CHATTERING IN GERMAN]

NARRATOR: By age 14, Nikiforov had been picked up

10 times by the police.

But fate was to send him to work in a tractor factory where there was a House of Culture that was famous throughout Stalingrad.

By age 16, he had an amazingly pure tenor voice.

The factory sent him to Moscow to the conservatory.

A year before the war, he returned to Stalingrad as a soloist with the Philharmonic and became a local celebrity.

On the first day of the war, he signed up as a volunteer.

For 20 days, he was lost in the human slaughterhouse of the Belarusian forests until he found his unit.

The Soviet military police questioned him for 20 days more.

Those terrible first months of the war made him stern, silent, and even cruel.

[SCREAMS]

[GASPING]

[GRUNTING]

[♪♪♪]

[SOBBING]

Take a look at this filthy animal.

Peter Kahn.

Recipient of an Iron Cross.

Born to respected Prussian stock.

Field Marshal Paulus invited me to lunch once.

He called me a hero.

A hero.

It's impossible to wage war against you people.

You know nothing of honor.

You're all bandits, who'd shoot someone in the back.

You're not fighting for victory, you want revenge.

I came here as a soldier.

You've turned me into a beast.

[PLAYING NOTES ON PIANO]

So, what do you say, want a shooting lesson?

Don't want to anymore?

Why are you shaking your head?

Speak up.

I still want to.

Want to.

Three, four, now she wants you on the floor.

You were here with the Germans...

but you don't talk about it.

That's not good.

Definitely not good.

Listen to that guy.

He doesn't talk, he spews.

He's got a dirty mouth.

Katya, don't listen to him.

What are you looking at?

You want to know how we lived under the Germans?

What they did to us?

Why I'm still alive?

And not with Mama and Papa in a grave?

Why I didn't kill myself?

Go on, ask. Don't be shy.

Go ahead and ask.

Our defenders.

You want details?

I just couldn't do it.

I was scared.

I was waiting for you.

Shoot Go on, then.

What's the matter?

I'll kill him. Sit down!

Sit down!

He said sit down.

Forget what you just heard.

Polyakov, go calm her down.

[EXPLOSION IN DISTANCE]

PO LYAKOV: Mortars.

[♪♪♪]

Some kind of artillery.

I have a beautiful wife.

I chose her from the village for her beauty.

My village is far away, near Bryansk.

We made a life.

We were happy.

I took care of her.

I bought her a kerchief, some felt boots.

She liked me to stroke herhead.

I'd come home and sit by her, she'd put her head on my lap, and I'd stroke it.

She had long, black hair.

Just before New Year's in '39, we had a daughter.

I look like a grandpa, right?

[CHUCKLES]

But I had a baby daughter.

I'm sleepy-

May I?

Just a little nap.

I'm not heavy.

NARRATOR: By then, Vasiliy Polyakov's wife and daughter had been dead for almost a year.

They'd been living in Moscow where Polyakov had been given two rooms.

They died senselessly during a bombing in October, 1941.

They didn't reach the shelter.

They had stopped to help a woman whose baby carriage had fallen over.

She and her baby lived, but they didn't.

Polyakov's wife was 26 years younger than him.

He told all this to my mother, who for him, on that night, was the only person on earth.

You're a good girl, Katya. Pure.

Don't be afraid.

Masha, Masha, fascist tramp.

Masha, Masha, fascist tramp.

Off to wash?

You'll never get clean.

Go away.

Getting water?

Here's some water for you!

CHVANOV: ♪ Strike, my rifle ♪

♪ Quick and true ♪

♪ No mercy ♪

♪ For the foe ♪

♪ I'll help you with my sharp saber ♪ What is it?

You said you'd teach me to shoot.

[CHUCKLES]

Lie down, I'll teach you.

Butt on your shoulder, your fingers go here.

I've seen you hold the rifle.

Teach me to use the sight.

Put your target in the crosshairs and shoot.

KATYA: Who's that?

CHVANOV: Some woman.

She's pretty.

Yeah. I've seen her a few times.

There's a kraut who goes to that cellar.

Maybe to see her?

Shoot her.

Are you stupid?

[CHUCKLES]

A German.

CHVANOV: You're right.

Lucky you. Found a German on the first try.

Now look.

Look at his head and chest, head and chest.

KATYA: He's thin. Glasses. Walks like a goose.

Not too old.

Don't watch him, watch where he goes. Follow him.

Take him.

Stop!

[♪♪♪]

You got him with the first shot. Well done.

What was that, idiot?

What was what, commander?

You killed a soldier getting water.

A Nazi, not a soldier.

Even animals don't kill at the waterside.

You know the saying, captain?

"Kill him each time you see him."

I don't give a damn if he's drinking, eating or shitting.

I killed him and I'll keep on killing.

Mother said they killed my brother because his name was Vladimir llyich, just like Lenin.

The kid was 7 years old.

Do soldiers do that?

I'm the one who killed him.

Get out of my sight.

[♪♪♪]

NARRATOR: Misha Chvanov's mother hadn't told him everything.

She couldn't. The SS terrorized his village, raped his beautiful older sister and left her for dead in the pigsty.

His mother was wounded.

Almost burned alive.

She joined the partisans.

They had to amputate her wounded arm due to gangrene.

Luckily she was left-handed so Misha didn't notice any difference in her handwriting.

There are times you look like a normal woman to me.

You could be German or French.

As if you wouldn't stab me in the back as soon as I turned around.

But we both know the truth.

I don't understand a word.

[MEN SHOUTING INDISTINCTLY IN GERMAN IN DISTANCE]

[SHOUTING CONTINUES]

MAN [IN GERMAN]: Everyone out. You have five minutes.

Just grab what's important.

[BOY SPEAKING INDISTINCTLY]

Well, this certainly is a sight.

A German soldier in his underpants with a Russian whore while the fuhrer's army fights tooth and nail for the Volga.

Such exemplary camaraderie.

I'm speechless, captain.

Yes.

You've actually rendered me speechless.

Do you have anything to say for yourself?

Right.

I thought as much.

May I ask a question, sir?

You may not.

High Command has ordered us to cleanse the combat zone.

So we're cleansing the combat zone of scum and filth.

Hm.

What do you think, Kahn?

Is she scum, or filth?

Well, I understand, you know.

You haven't captured a Russian fortress, but you did conquer a cottage.

You felt like celebrating.

As a man, I can understand you.

But not as an officer.

Corporal.

Find a few women to do laundry.

[IN GERMAN] Yes, sir, colonel.

Take the old and ugly ones.

We have to get rid of these damn lice somehow.

[♪♪♪]

GROMOV: Get up, go with Nikiforov.

I'm not going anywhere. Leave.

Listen, you really have to get out of here.

You're not good for the guys.

They're not fighting for their country or Stalin. They fight for you.

That's bad.

Why? Get dressed.

They can kill you, dummy.

They can't kill the motherland.

But you, there's no way we can defend you.

If they kill you, the guys will fall apart.

Are you fighting for me too?

I won't fall apart.

I want to fight with you.

To kill Germans. To shoot them.

Listen, children under 16...

My Passport.

You're right. Today's the 15th.

So it's your birthday?

I'm 18, old enough to fight.

Nineteen today.

Happy birthday.

I'll go tell the others.

So...

Leave her alone, captain.

Got it?

Yeah, I got it.

Stand up.

[GRUNTING]

Quiet, quiet. You hear me?

Quiet, I said.

Listen to me, Sissy. It's no good.

Hear me? No good.

She's not your woman, got it?

Do you understand?

At ease.

[♪♪♪]

[CHATTERING IN GERMAN]

GROMOV: Bastards are dug in behind the store.

They'll bomb the crossing. Can't hit them from here.

Sissy.

Can you get your boys from across the river to hit them?

Too dangerous. They'd hit us too.

MAN 1 : Into the water!

[SCREAMS]

MAN 2: Charge!

ASTAKHOV: I'll take them out myself with the cannon.

Cannons don't shoot around corners.

They do for me.

[♪♪♪]

[MEN SHOUTING INDISTINCTLY]


[MAN 1 SPEAKING IN GERMAN]

Where are you taking them?

[IN GERMAN] To the station, captain.

Why? To load them on trains.

Masha!

Masha!


Masha!

MAN 2 [IN RUSSIAN OVER PA]: Working with Germany, you'll make a happy future for yourselves.

[IN GERMAN] Captain, this vehicle belongs to the army post.

It belongs to the Wehrmacht, idiot.

[♪♪♪]

[CROWD CLAMORING]

Masha! Masha!

Get on!

[PEOPLE SCREAM]

Get on.

Masha, get on.

[CROWD MURMURING]

GROMOV: Quiet, Chvanov.

Lieutenant Astakhov's smart. He went to an academy.

Not like you, hayseed.

Village idiot.

An academy is one thing, shooting around corners is another.

GROMOV: Well, Sissy?

Will it take long? I'm ready.

Superintendent, I only have one shell.

But orders are orders.

So be it. It'll work.

Move over.

Let's see.

ASTAKHOV: I see the target.

The tank turret. Lower left corner.

I think I got the angle right.

So?

Fire?

POLYAKOV: Maybe God kissed you on the head?

[♪♪♪]

[♪♪♪]

CHVANOV: Hell yes!

In Stalingrad, even broken tanks shoot! Ha-ha-ha!

NARRATOR: Sergey Astakhov studied at the artillery academy in his hometown, Podolsk.

Just over a year ago, in October, '41, he and the other cadets were called up to defend the town of Maloyaroslavets.

He was the only one from his unit to survive.

Nobody then would have called him a sissy.

But he was, in fact, shy with girls.


COLONEL: Kahn!

Are you out of your mind?

They shot at us from that building!

You didn't report artillery there.

You got snared by a Russian whore and failed us.

Where were you?

Answer me!

I'm going to shoot that whore.

She turned my best officer into a mindless idiot.

And you, I'll have you shot too.

Fine.

[MAN SCREAMING IN DISTANCE]

But first I'm going to take that building.

She'll wait here.

Kahn, if you don't take the building, I'll have you executed.

I know...

colonel.

[♪♪♪]


NARRATOR: All the people my mother had known and loved her whole life, all her friends, neighbors and family, had been killed right before her eyes.

How she could bear this, how she survived, I can't tell you.

She rarely spoke of the first months of the war.


She often told me stories about peacetime life in the building. I imagined all its inhabitants.

I knew that Misha Sazonov was her neighbor, that Mitya and Lena Kulikov were her friends from downstairs, that Auntie Khasil gave her music lessons.

They had all been killed in the August bombing raids.

The neighbors buried them under some ruins since the cemetery was too far away.

The last graves appeared after the Germans took the building.

Nikiforov. Let me go, come on.

I need to go. I'm looking for a present.

For Katya.

A birthday present. Okay?

Mama dug the graves herself with her last ounce of strength.

Fourteen people, adults and children, lay in shallow graves covered with stones.

Mama buried her sister and mother, my aunt and grandma, on the end so she wouldn't forget where they were.

[WHISPERING] It's here somewhere.

There it is.

A shell hit their plumbing.

They have no water, no bath.

I bet she's been washing with a rag for six months and with cold water.

She'll be happy-

Krasnov.

MAN [IN GERMAN]: What was her name? Olga? Olga from the Volga.

[MEN LAUGH]

MAN: They're all called Olga or Natasha here.

[MEN LAUGHING AND CHATTERING]

[WHISPERS IN GERMAN] Shut up.

[IN NORMAL VOICE] Sergeant Scheumann, captain. What can I do?

Do you have cigarettes? Yes, sir.

Otto, the cigarettes.

What's broken? Everything.

And the cannon? Also broken.

It's the firing pin. Why don't you fix it?

We don't have parts.

Supply is down. I don't care if the tank runs.

I need the cannon.

Fix it or you'll attack on foot.

That's all.

Crawl? The hell with that.

Russian sailors don't crawl like lizards.

Astakhov, there's a beat-up tank over there.

Want to give that to Katya as a present? Huh?

Okay. First torpedo, stand by.

Second torpedo, stand by.

Fire.

[♪♪♪]

They're up to something.

MAN [IN GERMAN]: Attention!

Eyes straight ahead!

Are you the reinforcements? Yes, sir.

What does your belt buckle say?

Spit it out! "God with us."

"God with us."

Wherever God is, our fuhrer, Adolf Hitler, is.

And wherever Hitler is, all of Germany is.

Germany is here with us right here.

I ask you, what more do you need to take down this damn building?

I'm listening! ALL: Nothing, captain!

Beyond this building is the Volga.

Beyond this building is the end of the war.

Beyond this building is India.

In India, all of the whores have six arms.

Think of what those six hands can all do at the same time.

Is there anyone not keen to go to India?

You have 15 minutes.

Then we attack.

MAN: Attention!

Sissy, get upstairs. Go on, I said.

Katya, go with them.

Yell if anything happens.

Angel, get out of here.

Chvanov, Nikiforov, take the corners.

I'll take the middle.

Come on. Let's go. Faster. Everybody to that side.

Right side, that way. Spread out.

Come on, Fritz, over here!

Faster. Faster. Faster.

Let's go. Let's go.

Come on.

[♪♪♪]

So they shoot, they come in and then we cut them up.

Take cover.

[WIND WHISTLING]


MAN [IN GERMAN]: No survivors down here.

Check the upper floors. Aah!

[SCREAMING]

[YELLS]

[SCREAMS]

[YELLING]

Where are you going?

Freeze!

Not so fast, captain.

[GRUNTING]

Bad timing, Chvanov.

COLONEL: Do you know what you are, Kahn? You are a disgrace to the entire Wehrmacht!

I'm going to headquarters now.

So you have some time.

I hope you'll use that time wisely, captain.

What? Captain.

We've fixed the cannon.

Shot dead.

Didn't feel any pain.

That one, either.

Where's Katya?

In her room.

I'm gonna go dig the graves.

[FLOORBOARD CREAKING]

No, I won't go!

I'm not going anywhere!

[CANNON FIRES]

Fire!

What's wrong?

Why don't you fire?

The mechanism is stuck, captain.

It's stuck again.

Shit!

[♪♪♪]

[COUGHING]

NARRATOR: Captain Gromov was a professional hero. Wherever there was war, he was there.

Guangzhou, Khalkhin Gol, the Mannerheim Line.

He had no loved ones, no family, no place he wanted to go back to.

He'd been wounded three times.

Once almost fatally. You're bleeding.

Where?

You have a shard.

Glass.

[SPITS]

Listen, get out of here.

Just leave.

You hear me?

I'm begging you.

Well? I can't hear you.

I'm not going anywhere.

NARRATOR: Mama's home was the first one he'd ever felt attached to.

And Mama was the only woman he had ever cared about for so long.

GROMOV: Why did you come to me?

For what sins?

Why do I deserve you?

[♪♪♪]

KAHN: Will I ever again sit this peacefully with a woman... stroking her hair?

I don't understand you, Petya.

In Russian, you're Pyotr.

Petya for short.

Petya.

Not Petya.

[EXPLOSIONS IN DISTANCE]

Petya.

Petya.

Petya.

Everything sounds funny in Russian.

Masha...

Petya, Volga, whatever.

Love. Do you know what that means?

I love you.

Love.

[IN GERMAN] Love, love.

[IN RUSSIAN] Your people would love to shoot me, and mine would love it more.

I don't care anymore.

[SPEAKS INDISTINCTLY]

[MASHA SPEAKS IN RUSSIAN]

[IN RUSSIAN] I don't care.

[BOTH SPEAK IN RUSSIAN]

[IN GERMAN] I love you.

[SPEAKS IN RUSSIAN]

[♪♪♪]


Move aside.

A little gift.

Thank you.

Smell it.

[SNIFFS]

[SNIFFS]

Bliss.

[ALL CHUCKLE]

[SPEAKS IN RUSSIAN]

Blow it out.

[♪♪♪]

[ALL LAUGH]


Well, shall we drink?

[ALL LAUGH]

POLYAKOV: Happy birthday. CHVANOV: Happy birthday.

Happy birthday.

Ooh.

Help yourselves. Heh, heh, heh.

Ah, the main attraction.

Alexander Nikiforov will sing love songs and arias.

[ALL CHUCKLE]

To the piano.

[ALL LAUGH]

[PIANO PLAYING AND NIKIFOROV SINGING OPERA]


What am I supposed to do?

[PIANO PLAYING AND NIKIFOROV SINGING IN DISTANCE]

What do I do?

Tell me, German.

What do I do?

Damned war!

Damned country! Damned building!

KATYA: Thanks, Sasha.

ASTAKHOV: Now a gift from all of us. Come on.

[♪♪♪]


Ahem. Heroes, the women's section is now open.

Let's go downstairs.

[CHVANOV CLEARS THROAT]


Let me see.

He's carried that tie since the war started.

Heh, heh. Funny. There's a naked girl, but we can't look.

And we might die today.

You know what they say, there's no life beyond the Volga.

Angel, any left?

[EXPLOSIONS IN DISTANCE]

Okay, warriors.

Sleep.

Hurry up. Get dressed.

I'm taking that building tomorrow, whatever the cost.

We have to get you to safety.

Nearby is a fire station with a tower.

Nobody goes up there. Not us, not the Russians.

I'll hide you there.

For one day.

One day.


Sergey. Don't go.

I'm so happy...

I'm scared.

[♪♪♪]

Scared because you're happy?

Yes.

I shouldn't be happy.

It's a war.

Katya, get dressed.

Please, get dressed.

I need to show you something.

It's not far.

The commander said it's okay.

[♪♪♪]


KATYA: Sergey.

Where are you taking me?

ASTAKHOV: Just a minute.


Sit down.

Sit down.

It'll start now.

Look.

[EXPLOSIONS IN DISTANCE]

[♪♪♪]

This was my lookout point.

[GUNFIRE IN DISTANCE]

Then the Germans found it.

They started shelling us.

We decided to redeploy.

Rem?

To move. Oh.

They caught us downstairs.

[GUNFIRE IN DISTANCE]

Stay behind me.

[EXPLOSIONS IN DISTANCE]

[KAHN WHISPERS IN GERMAN]

Bitch.

Why are there no Germans here?

Isn't it strange?

They're everywhere, but not here.

That's true.

It is strange. I hadn't thought about it.

Must be the only building in the city like that.

No Germans and no Russians.

That's good. We'll wait it out here.

Wait out what?

Wait out the fear...

wait out the night...

wait out the terror.

The war. We'll wait out everything.

Like we're on a cloud.

Katya.

I love you.

I've loved you for two days now.

I know.

[GUNFIRE]

[WHISPERING] Come.

Here.

You're staying here.

You're not going anywhere.

I'll be back.

[♪♪♪]

[WATER SPLASHING]

Pew!

[HUMMING]

Nikiforov.

Where's Katya? Where's Astakhov? Find them.

[suns-nus]

[♪♪♪]

[EXPLOSIONS AND GUNFIRE IN DISTANCE]


Wait.

What is it?

You'll come back?

Go back. Go back.

[GUNSHOT]

Kraut whore.

[♪♪♪]


[♪♪♪]

Russian!


MAN 1 [IN GERMAN]: Colonel. We got a Russian scout.

Where did you find him?

Kahn found him by the fire station.

He'd killed four of our snipers.

Captain Kahn?

Bravo.

MAN 2 [IN GERMAN]: What do we do with this scum?

Kahn, what should we do with him?

Interrogate him.

COLONEL: Interrogate him?

How? You speak Russian?

[IN GERMAN] I speak German.

Get up, gramps. Don't just sit there.

Tell your mutts to give me food and water.

Why are you just standing there?

I'm a Russian officer on his knees, you animals.

Where did you come from? From that building or the other bank?

I have a present for you.

What?

I have a present for you. What?

[IN RUSSIAN] From a Russian girl.

Speak German. Katya.

[SCREAMING]

[GROANING]

How strange.

I feel nothing.

Nothing.

No pain or anything.

But it itches under my arms.

The least these damn lice could do is let you die in peace.

[♪♪♪]


[IN GERMAN] Lieutenant Schmidt, reporting.

Captain Kahn.

You got any cigarettes?

I'm driving to the crossing the Russians are building over the Volga.

Do you see that building?

See those two top floor windows?

I see them.

The Russian I want has his headquarters there.

Will the cannon reach?

It's right in the line of fire.

Then do it.

[TANKS' ENGINES REVVING]

[GASPS]

What's that? ASTAKHOV: Nothing.

Just some noise. Come on, go to sleep. It's early.

I need to go home.

[EXPLOSION IN DISTANCE]

I fell in love with you right away, at first sight.

I saw you and knew I loved you.

I love you too.

Really?

[♪♪♪]

Really.

I'm going now.

I have to.

I'm going too. No.

Wait for me here. Understand?

All right.

[MAN SHOUTING IN GERMAN]

[♪♪♪]


[♪♪♪]

[♪♪♪]


[♪♪♪]

It's all over now!

Are you alive?

Yeah. What about you?

[♪♪♪]

[IN STRAINED VOICE] I'm okay.

You go ahead.

I'll wait for Nikiforov.

Go on.

[PIANO PLAYS]

KRASNOV: We're going to die... in an orchestra pit.

So, Angel, time to go to heaven? Heh, heh.

Why just to heaven?

I'm going to paradise.

I have a pass.

[LAUGHS]

[GUNFIRE]

[MAN SCREAMS]

[GUNFIRE NEARBY]

[GRUNTING]

Heh, heh, heh. KAHN: You're not the one.

Where is the other guy?

Where is the other Russian?

[GUNSHOT]

[CHUCKLES]

KAHN: Russian!

Russki!

HQ, come in, damn it.

[RADIO SIGNAL WAVERING]

HQ.

This is Gromov.

Get up.


[GRUNTING]

Sissy, don't shoot.

The radio.

Do it.

[RADIO SIGNAL WAVERING]

ASTAKHOV: HQ. HQ.

HQ.

MAN [ON RADIO]: This is HQ. I read you. This is Kaluga.

Give us an air-strike, now.

Coordinates:

24,17,14.

Do you read me?

MAN: Kaluga. I didn't read you.

That's the building where our men are.

Is that right?

Mm-hm.

Yes, that's us!

The Germans are coming in! Send an air-strike now!

I hear you, Kaluga. I hear you.

Goodbye, boys.

That's it.

Won't be long now.

GROMOV: Wondering about Katya?

She's fine. I hid her away.

She told me to say hello.

[♪♪♪]

She also said...

she loves you very much.

[EXPLOSIONS IN DISTANCE]

[♪♪♪]


NARRATOR: It was in Stalingrad, November, 1942.

Still to come were months of bloody fighting that would turn the tide of human history and the history of my great country.

Mama wanted me always to remember the people to whom millions upon millions owe their lives and freedom.

And though she named me after my father, Sergey, she always said I had five fathers.

[INDISTINCT RADIO CHATTER]

[NINA SPEAKING IN GERMAN]

NINA [IN ENGLISH]: Downstairs.

And he talked to us.

They had Sergey. Where is he? He talked with me.

Astakhov's there.

Sergey. Over there.

[♪♪♪]


NARRATOR: Mama also said I'm lucky, since I take after all of them.

And also because, thanks to my fathers and the fathers of my countrymen, I have no idea what war is.

Stalingrad

[♪♪♪]


[♪♪♪]